It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

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Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist

Award Winning FX Makeup Artist Coming To TSPA

It’s the cree-creepiest season of all, with the spider webs hanging, and ghost-chains a-clanging, and creatures that crawl!

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose can not wait until Halloween Eve. We get to bust out or FX makeup and create some creepy zombies, and to help us prefect our dead zombie we have awarding winning FX Makeup Artist Elizabeth Fox coming to TSPA on October 26th. Check out some of her work below and read her bio to learn more.

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Elizabeth Fox has been a professional working makeup artist since 2000, with over 20 feature films to her credit.

Elizabeth was a molder at Evolution Effects and Steve Johnson’s XFX lab.  She won Best FX Makeup at the Chicago Horror Festival, the same year she collaborated with Danny Devito on his series of short horror films titled Splatter Shorts.  In 2007, Elizabeth came home to the Bay Area where she continues to shoot commercials, film and TV, along with teaching.  Elizabeth’s work has appeared in numerous national magazines, during a commercial break at the Super bowl, on billboards & buses and even on the showgirls for Ringling Bro’s Barnum and Bailey Circus.

News: Peanut…. Peanut Butter and Honey

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Too faced did it again, and now in early 2017 we will have the Peanut Butter and Honey shadow collection. Checkout this fab article by BY DEVON ABELMAN for Allure.com

From chocolate to peaches, Too Faced has the scented eye-shadow palette game on lock. The Too Faced Peanut Butter Honey palette is about to be added to the brand’s ever-growing roster of food-inspired makeup palettes. Jerrod Blandino, the brand’s cofounder, announced the upcoming release on Instagram yesterday with the caption: “Salty & Sweet! @ultabeauty #sneakypeek #spring2017 #21DaysOfBeauty #toofaced.”

The upcoming palette is a spin-off of the popular Peanut Butter and Jelly Eye Shadow Collection, which launched earlier this year. If the Too Faced Peanut Butter Honey palette is anything like its predecessor, it will come with nine creamy shadows that smell like the theme of the palette. I’m hoping for golden yellow shadows and coppery brown shades to choose from. I’m also pretty pumped about this launch because I ride-or-die for the Too Faced Peanut Butter and Jelly Eye Shadow Collection. Peanut Brittle, a metallic copper, is my go-to fall shadow shade. And the PB&J scent is no joke. Every time I open up the palette, I’m brought back to my days in the elementary school cafeteria eating a peanut-butter sandwich. (I was anti-jelly as a child.)

If this palette is as popular as the PB&J one, I’m placing my bets that a peanut butter, banana, and bacon one isn’t too far behind. Elvis deserves his own eye-shadow palette in the form of his favorite sandwich, if you ask me. As for the release date of the Too Faced Peanut Butter Honey palette, we may be waiting for a while—it looks like it won’t hit Ulta stores until spring 2017.

Kim Kardashian’s Daily Makeup Routine Costs Over $700

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose is excited to learned about Kim K’s $700.00 makeup routine!

This week our girl Kim Kardashian gave us more insight in her personal makeup routine on her app. We learned that Kim’s makeup routine cost over $700.00 bucks! You will be surprised to learn that she is not all about luxury products, she also has some goodies from your local CVS and Sephora. Some of her top makeup bag must haves are, Neutrogena night calming face wipes, Giogio Armani fluid sheer foundation and Nars Blush in orgasm. Checkout the clip below, to get a sneak peek of the look.

Want to learn to create smokey eyes like Kim’s? Learn how to smoke, shade and highlight a models face to  perfection when you enroll into our cosmetology, aesthetics or makeup program at The Salon professional Academy in San Jose.

 

Can I get a facial while pregnant?

 

 

 

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Can I get a facial while pregnant? This is one of the most important question we often get asked here at The Salon Professional Academy with our Dermalogica spa treatments, and the answer is yes! You can safely indulge in a Dermalogica basic facial here at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. If your skin care therapist feels your skin is resilient enough to handle the Deramalogica basic facial, they may also include extractions to help purify your skin even more. Your skincare therapist might even find that you skin is hyper sensitive during your pregnancy and will recommend the Dermalogica Ultra Calming facial.

There will be some service types and products that you do need to avoid during your pregnancy. A major skin care ingredient you need to stop using and avoid during this time is retinoids.  Retinoid’s are a type of vitamin A. They are important in a skin care regime to help with cell turn over and prevent collagen loss, but retinoids can be harmful to your unborn child. A service that must be avoided is chemical peels. Chemical peels can include the following chemicals: lactic acid, glycolic, salicylic.  Glycolic and salicylic have not been proven to be safe during pregnancy, but lactic acid peels have. Lactic acids peels are safe during pregnancy, because they are gentle on the skin and lactic acid is found natural in the body.

We would love for all moms to be, to come relax and enjoy a Dermalogica facial at our student spa, but before you book your appointment make sure to consult with your Doctor before any treatment. We look forward to pampering you in our spa.

 

 

HEATCURE PROFESSIONAL RESTORATION SERVICE FOR HAIR

 

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Heatcure Redken Professional restoration service for hair

One of the biggest culprits of damaged hair is heat however it is also the most effective way to restore it. The heatcure professional service is different from other restorative treatments because it can only be activated when using with its specifically designed tool. It can last up to 10 washes and be used on fine-medium, coarse and curly hair. Even the most damaged hair is instantly restored to a healthy vibrant look and feel. The treatment also includes a at home weekly at home self-heating mask that can be used in-between services.

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After shampooing your stylist will apply 4-7 pumps of heat cure to your wet hair then taking the specially designed tool that is specifically designed to be used at a low temperature of 284’F. They will glide through your hair section to activate the formula. When finished the stylist will rinse your hair and style as usual.

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How to use heatcure self-heating mask at home

  1. Peel before shower, open mask so it can start the self-heating.
  2. Wait 2-4 minutes for mask to start heating (do not put under water)
  3. After shampoo open and squeeze contents into hands and distribute formula through hair. Leave on for 5-10 minutes and then rinse.

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Based off of a 50 women focus group…

96%  of clients agree there hair felt more conditioned

94%  agreed it looked healthier 10 washed later

70%  of clients were satisfied

96%  of clients who tried at home treatment agreed hair felt more nourished and conditioned

86%  agreed hair looked healthier

80% agreed hair felt less damaged

http://www.redken.com