Day In The Life Of A Skincare Expert!

Esthetics Classes Now Enrolling

Are you thinking about becoming a esthetician with the help of The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. Choosing to work in the career of skincare is amazing, and with the skin care industry to reach $11 Billion dollars by 2018, you can bet you will have a sustainable and fun career.

Not sure exactly what an esthetician does? We have an informative list of what a skincare specialist does day to day. Check it out below!

Typical Day for Skincare Specialists

Here is a list of tasks that Skincare Specialists do every day.

  • Sterilize equipment and clean work areas.
  • Examine clients’ skin, using magnifying lamps or visors when necessary, to evaluate skin condition and appearance.
  • Cleanse clients’ skin with water, creams, or lotions.
  • Demonstrate how to clean and care for skin properly and recommend skin-care regimens.
  • Select and apply cosmetic products such as creams, lotions, and tonics.

Weekly and Monthly Tasks

Here is a list of tasks that Skincare Specialists do on a weekly or monthly basis.

  • Stay abreast of latest industry trends, products, research, and treatments.
  • Refer clients to medical personnel for treatment of serious skin problems.
  • Remove body and facial hair by applying wax.
  • Apply chemical peels to reduce fine lines and age spots.
  • Advise clients about colors and types of makeup and instruct them in makeup application techniques.

 

Okay, you read all the fun facts, now it is time to set up your TSPA tour. Please give us a ring at (408) 579-9111 or send us an email . We look forward to seeing you at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose.

Hair News: Princess Leia The Hair Icon!

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“I’d like to wear my old hairstyle again—but with white hair; I think that would be funny,” Carrie Fisher told TV Guide in 2014. And who could doubt the object of her amusement, those storied side-slung Princess Leia buns? In her long career, Fisher knew how to write and deliver a punch line. She also knew how to wear one, with a sly feminist twist. That first Princess Leia hairstyle, two enormous buns plastered on either side of her head, is arguably the most recognizable movie hairdo of the past 50 years. The look has ricocheted through the decades in comedy skits, Halloween costumes, online hairstyle tutorials, and mountains of Star Wars merch. In one episode of 30 Rock, Tina Fey as Liz Lemon wore the style in an effort to seem “crazy” and get out of jury duty (it didn’t work).

 

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But humor wasn’t always the point. Female empowerment takes many forms, and for many who relished the inclusion of a confident, brave, happily-single woman in the action movie oeuvre, it took the form—partially at least—of bodacious side buns. And some no doubt simply welcomed another choice at the party store that wasn’t quite as objectifying as bunny ears or a Wilma Flintstone wig. Who would choose to playact as a pin-up or a stone age wife when you could be the leader of the Rebel Alliance?

There’s a wide chasm between contemporary fashion and sci-fi costume fantasy. It would be a little disappointing if a heroine from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away had a chic bob or a ladylike French twist. Certainly, there are other crazy hairstyles in the film universe, but those buns stand out because they are at once simple and over-the-top. They’re also memorable and nearly impossible to overlook—both qualities more than a few feminist women, then or now, might aspire to. That contradiction, combined with Fisher’s campy delivery of some deeply cheesy lines—”Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi; you’re my only hope!”— made an indelible imprint on film hair-story.

The Princess Leia buns appeared in the first Star Wars movie in 1977. Lucas told Time magazine that he was “working very hard to create something that wasn’t fashion” with the overall look—specifically with Leia’s hair. This was a departure from B-movie sci-fi practice, where you’d often see huge ’60s bouffants or ’50s flips in outer space. (Spaceships must have some seriously talented intergalactic hairdressers on board.) “I went with a kind of southwestern Pancho Villa-woman revolutionary look,” Lucas said. “The buns are basically from turn-of-the-century Mexico.” Only trouble is, you can spend hours searching online photo archives (alas, I did) and still have absolutely no idea what he’s talking about. Perhaps by Pancho Villa he meant Leia’s revolutionary élan. And though much of this tribe is centered in northeastern Arizona, perhaps by “southwestern” he meant the Hopi people. The Hopi maiden “squash blossom” hairstyle bears a very strong resemblance to Leia’s oversized whorls (or rather the other way around).

This is not the only theory, of course. The Japanese Shimada chignon can have protuberances on each side. Vintage comic book images of Batgirl and Flash Gordan’s Queen Fria are another possible source of inspiration. And more recently, eagle-eyed viewers will have noticed a version of the side bun on the ladies of The Hollow Crown, a PBS mini-series of Shakespeare’s history plays. My money is on the squash blossom.


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Today, we hear “princess” and think of the Disney coterie—Sleeping Beauty, Belle, Jasmine, Ariel—swirling about in yards of pastel taffeta toward an inevitable destiny of landing a prince. Leia, in unruffled virginal white and those glorious buns, was a different kind of princess, an exemplar of first-wave feminism: a rebel wielding a blaster and mowing down Imperial Stormtroopers. A woman who, in the first movie at least, seems impatient and unimpressed with posturing males and is single-minded in her mission.

Still, there were chinks in her armor. That famous hairdo absurdly never seemed to move during multiple narrow escapes and scrapes with death. And, as Fisher cheekily wrote in her memoir The Princess Diarist, “Who wears that much lip gloss into battle?” She made it clear that she hated, yet still wore, that metallic gold bikini when she was enslaved to Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. Some parents were miffed that gold-bikini sex slave merchandise was still being marketed to kids, a controversy she didn’t tolerate, telling the Wall Street Journal that concerned parents could tell their kids that “a giant slug captured me and forced me to wear that stupid outfit, and then I killed him because I didn’t like it. And then I took it off. Backstage.”

For the entirety of her life, Fisher had an eye for the absurdities of moviemaking and fame that didn’t always jibe with feminist orthodoxies, but often did. “Please stop debating about whether or not I aged well, unfortunately it hurts all three of my feelings,” she tweeted last year. “My BODY hasn’t aged as well as I have.”

In another memoir, Wishful Drinking, Fisher recounted why she wasn’t allowed to wear a bra under Leia’s white dress. “There’s no underwear in space,” she recalled Lucas telling her. Puzzled, she asked him why, and he explained that in a weightless environment, your body would expand but your bra would not, so it would end up strangling you. “I think this would make for a fantastic obituary,” Fisher wrote. “I tell my younger friends that no matter how I go I want it reported that I drowned in moonlight, strangled by my own bra.”

And wearing those fantastic buns, no doubt.

Article BY DAVID DENICOLO

Makeup News: Cheeto Bronzer

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When applying bronzer, people often fear they’ll look unnaturally orange. Emily Susanah, however, is all about that cheese-like glow—literally. Weirdly enough, Cheetos bronzer exists. It debuted last month as part of the popular chip company’s holiday collection, and the beauty blogger recently posted a video on social media of herself trying the usual (and totally unexpected) beauty product out. When we say her mini tutorial has gone viral, we aren’t exaggerating. About 8.3 million people have viewed the clip she put on Instagram in the past week. We’re used to seeing Huda Kattan’s videos getting around 2 million, but 8 million people stopping to watch this hilarious video is a bit more than we can fathom. The universal love of Cheetos is real, guys. This video is proof.

In her viral video, Emily Susanah brushed the Colour de Cheeto Bronzer, which looks like queso poured into a cosmetic jar, in the usual places one would want to glow, like the hollows of the cheeks, along the hairline, and down either side of the nose. The final result looked like she wiped powdery remnants from the bottom of a Cheetos bag on her face. In her Instagram caption, the beauty blogger suggested alternative uses for the cheese-colored bronzer. “Obviously this would work better for eyeshadow, special effects, lips,” she wrote. We couldn’t agree more.

You can watch Emily Susanah’s Cheetos bronzer below.

BY DEVON ABELMAN

Start Your Aestheticians Training Today!

The Salon Professional Academy is known for educating top ranking skincare specialist in the San Jose and Bay Area.We focus on teaching clinical services like, PCA Sensi peel, Skin Scripts Enzymes and microdermabrasion. Have you ever thought about becoming an Esthetician, and wonder what it fully entails to become licensed?Check out the article below to learn more.

 

Through consultations and evaluations, estheticians determine the wants and needs of their clients, and then perform therapies, procedures, and treatments accordingly. Just a few of the esthetic therapies performed by state licensed estheticians include:

  • Waxing/threading/chemical depilatories to remove unwanted hair
  • Facials, exfoliations, and masks to improve skin tone, cleanse pores, and address skin that is oily, dry, acne-prone skin
  • Anti-aging treatments, such as laser therapies and chemical peels, to minimize or prevent fine lines and wrinkles
  • Microdermabrasion
  • Blackhead extraction
  • Wraps, sugar or salt scrubs, or moisturizing treatments for the body
  • Makeup application
  • Head, neck, and scalp massage

 

Esthetics programs, which are available through either dedicated schools of esthetics or schools of cosmetology, must meet the requirements set forth by each state’s board of cosmetology. Most states recognize esthetics programs that consist of 600 hours of coursework and practical training, although a number of states require more hours while others require significantly fewer. For example, esthetician license candidates in Wisconsin must complete a program that is at least 450 hours long, while candidates in Indiana must complete a program consisting of at least 700 hours.

Esthetics programs blend theory and practical study that will introduce students to everything from facials and makeup artistry to physiology and sanitation. These programs also include coursework that covers the business, ethics and professional standards of the esthetics industry.

Aspiring estheticians often select a program based on a number of factors, such as:

  • Price
  • Location
  • Class schedules
  • Part-time/evening/distance education options
  • Teaching philosophies
  • Class size

With the exception of Connecticut, which does not license estheticians, individuals practicing esthetics must be state licensed to do so. It is against the law to practice esthetics without a valid and current state license.

While some states use their own state-specific exams, many use the national esthetics examinations created by the National-Interstate Council on State Boards of Cosmetology (NIC).

Exploring Professional Opportunities in Esthetics
Estheticians may work in a number of settings, including full-service salons or spas, destination resorts/spas, cruise ships, esthetics salons or spas, wellness centers, and physician’s offices. Estheticians are also often found working alongside dermatologists and plastic surgeons in medical offices. Although esthetician services are not medical in nature, this type of partnership is often beneficial because estheticians can provide clients with procedures and therapies that complement medical treatments.

In spa settings, estheticians perform many treatments that are meant to relax and rejuvenate the client, as well as promote health and beautify the skin. For example, aromatherapy treatments using essential oils, herbs, and spices are very popular in day spas, resort spas, and the like.

Experienced estheticians also often go on to work as freelancers in the movie, television, fashion, and theater industries, and they often specialize their careers in niche industries, such as the lucrative bridal business. Most exciting, perhaps, is the fact that many estheticians become business owners themselves, opening salons, spas, or esthetics clinics of their own.

Looking to start your skincare training at The Salon Professional Academy? Please give us a ring at 408.579.9111  to schedule you tour today.

Article by http://www.estheticianedu.org/

Makeup News: Prep+Prime Essential Oils

 

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology and skincare school based in San Jose, is super excited about M.A.C Cosmetics new product launch of their Prep and Prime Oils. Check out the article below to learn more!

Just when you thought M.A.C. was done dropping its holiday offerings, the cult-favorite cosmetics brand goes and reveals a collection so cool it’s worthy of your immediate attention: the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils line.

The cosmetics-first brand is digging deeper into the skin-care realm with its latest line, the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils collection. How, you might ask? With a set of soothing plant-derived essentials oils formulated specifically for post-cleanse application—as a primer, if you will—before the rest of your skin-care routine. In case you’re just casually reading this post and not picking up what we’re putting down, it’s pretty big news. M.A.C. has managed to create an oil that isn’t slick or makeup repellant. Instead, it quenches the skin as it clings onto whatever you layer on top. That’s big news here in the beauty-sphere. Happily, the claims stack-up. A few drops under makeup result in nothing short of a healthy glow (and makeup that doesn’t budge).

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These botanical-infused oils come in three different scents for every nose-proclivity: There’s the zippy Grapefruit & Chamomile, the calming Sweet Orange & Lavender, and the energizing Yuzu, and each retails for $27. And in case you didn’t notice from the photo above, the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils collection also includes a Prep+Prime Essential Oils Stick, which offers the same soothing and hydrating benefits as the oils but in a solid stick form that’s great for under-eye touchups and hitting those hard-to-reach crevices, like around the nose. We should also mention, if you’re always on the go, this tiny tube might just be your new go-to, as after a few swipes of application, you can quickly pop it back into your bag before heading out the door. Can’t wait to get your hands on the line? Us either. Too bad you’ll have to wait until December 26. Post-presents shopping spree, anyone?

 

Article by SARAH KINONEN

When it comes to applying eyeliner, the struggle is so real

When it comes to applying eyeliner, the struggle is so real. Some have shaky hands, while others often tear up from product being applied very close to their eyes. If you fall into the latter category, Kim Kardahian’s makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic has some solutions.

We were #blessed to learn from him at a special, editors-only master makeup class in NYC hosted by Jergens. First of all, he feels your pain.

“There’s really nothing you can do about that, I hate when that happens,” he said. “Like it starts tearing on the corner and then your eyeliner gets messed up. It’s the worst.”

Mario explained three techniques to try when you get weepy putting pencil near your waterline.

The Tissue Tip

He advises to grab a tissue for the process. “My best tip over the years is just to have a tissue wrapped about your finger and before it comes out, you lightly tap it,” he explained.

The Breathing Technique

There is also a breathing technique you can try to keep the tears out all together. “Whenever you feel that tears are going to come out, there is a breathing technique you do,” he noted. “You breathe in through your nose, and what happens is that you suck the tears in as opposed from them being able to come out. It’s tricky, but you can get the hang of it when you start to practice it.” Perhaps this is another reason to take up meditation in 2017.

The Bobby Pin Hack

The most interesting tidbit we learned comes from women overseas. “When I was in the Middle East, the Arab girls taught me a trick,” he said. “You take a bobby pin and you clip it to your ear. And its painful but somehow that doesn’t allow your tears to come out. I haven’t tried that but apparently the girls in the Middle East, they do that.”

Makeup News: A Gold Mask For You and The Angles!

 

BY SARAH KINONEN

Today’s the day: The Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show officially tapes tonight (though it doesn’t air until next week). But before the Angels hit the runway in Paris, they’ve got all kinds of prepping to do. Which explains the Victoria’s Secret models’ gold face masks you’ve been seeing all over your social feeds.

In the days leading up to the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, Angels including Elsa Hosk, Alessandra Ambrosio, Sara Sampaio, and Irina Shayk, to name a few, traveled to skin-care guru Mimi Luzon’s headquarters for some skin R&R in the form of some seriously superluxe 24-karat-gold face masks.

 

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The mask in question, Mimi Luzon 24K Pure Gold Treatment, which is made with gold leaf, is said to “improve skin’s elasticity, texture, and tone,” according to the product’s description on Luzon’s website, and will set you back a whopping $220 for three masks. Pricey? Totally. But considering the benefits of adding gold to your skin-care regimen, the splurge-worthy treatment just might be worth it. (We said “might”!)

The precious metal is known to reduce skin inflammation and may help slow premature aging and wrinkling, Joshua Zeichner, a dermatologist in New York City, previously told Allure. And according to Zeichner, gold has also been shown to brighten complexions over time. (Insert glitter emojis here.)

Besides the good-for-you takeaways of using the luxe elixir, along with supermodel-like skin, you’ll also take home a couple of Instagram-worthy selfies. (Need proof? Peek at the photos below.) But before you start slathering on the ultrarich treatment, be warned, especially if you have allergies, advises Zeichner. “I have many patients who cannot even tolerate their gold jewelry,” he says. “In the event of a red rash, either from your jewelry or from a skin cream spiked with gold, wash it off immediately and visit your dermatologist for evaluation.”

Skin News:Your Skin Doesn’t Have to Peel With a Peel.

While earlier versions of acid-based exfoliating treatments could make skin visibly slough away, the latest formulas leave skin glowing, not flaking. Many include several alpha and beta hydroxy acids, rather than just one at a higher concentration. “When you combine acids at lower strengths, they’re potentially less irritating,” says New York City dermatologist Dennis Gross. And you don’t have to see peeling to see results. “As the acid dissolves the cement between skin cells, you may have thousands of them coming off at the same time—but the shedding is still invisible to the naked eye,” says Neal Schultz, a clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

An acid product is only as potent as the free-acid compounds floating around inside it. Too many acid bits and your skin stings and gets red; too few and nothing happens (we mean nada—no exfoliation, no glow). So chemists play with the pH, which adjusts the amount of free acids. The ideal pH is between 3 and 4, but it’s almost never listed on packaging. So how do you pick a winner? Some experts say your skin should tingle for a few seconds when you apply the product. “If the acid is penetrating, you’re going to feel something,” says Eric ­Bernstein, a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. And expect some instant gratification. “An effective product should leave your skin looking immediately refreshed,” says Gross. (Discover our six favorites.)

“Acids don’t work like retinoids, which repair skin by kick-starting inflammation,” says Ranella Hirsch, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine. “They dissolve the upper layer of cells to trigger repair.” Plus, unlike with scrubs, the skin is not damaged by abrasives. So if you’re sensitive, acids are actually a wise choice. Look for formulas that combine them with an amino acid, like arginine, which slows their penetration into skin. (We like Philosophy Hope in a Jar Night.) And don’t rush in. “Irritation can take a while to show up,” says Hirsch. “You may get to day four, then all of a sudden your skin reacts.” Take a month to ramp up to daily use.

Magnanimous girlfriends and pug owners insist that size doesn’t matter, but cosmetic chemists disagree. The smaller a molecule, the more easily it gets into the skin. Because glycolic is the smallest of all the acids, it yields the most dramatic results. “There’s a reason glycolic is the acid used the most in anti-aging products and doctor’s-office peels,” says Hirsch. “It does the job.” Almost as well as a prescription retinoid, says Schultz. (Try Avon Anew Clinical Advanced Retexturizing Peel.) Some dermatologists believe that no one talks about how glycolic acid changes the structure of the skin because then the FDA will call it a drug, regulate it, and suddenly we’ll need to see a doctor to get it. But the truth is that it regenerates collagen, thickens the epidermis and dermis, and evens skin tone. (Shhhh.)

Now for the reality check: Over-the-counter acid products—even most doctor’s-office peels—cannot smooth deep lines. “Only fillers and laser procedures can do that,” says Wilma Bergfeld, a senior dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “These compounds can minimize fine lines and fade blotches, but they have limitations.” According to Hirsch, your skin gets the most from acids in your 20s and 30s: “After that, I have patients treat serious damage with a prescription retinoid and refresh their skin with regular peels at home or in my office.”

To treat a blotchy chest, extend your AHA face cream a few inches south. Clear up bacne (or, worse, buttne) with a salicylic acid body wash: Apply it to dry skin, wait 15 minutes, then get in the shower and rinse. When the backs of your arms feel like a plucked goose, don’t try to scrub the bumps away—they’ll just get inflamed. Instead, apply a lotion with AHAs or BHAs to unclog the pores and dissolve the dry skin.

Yummy DIY Skincare You Can Eat

Sometimes our skin can have a mind of its own. One day it decides to be beautiful and glowing, but within a day it can easily change its mind and create a stressful situation for you! If you find yourself in one of these situations without time to head to the beauty store, it’s okay because we’ve got you covered! We’ve targeted some of the main reasons that your skin could be acting out and some DIY masks to conquer the issues! The best part? These remedies are edible and can be made with ingredients right from your pantry. You heard us, you won’t know whether to spread it your face or to spread it on a cracker. What’s better than skincare that is good for your insides and your outsides? Nothing. Nothing beats edible skincare products.

The Weather

One of the first and most obvious reason that your skin can change is going to be the weather; you’re the only one that has to adjust to the temperature change! When you are headed into those chillier months and you feel your skin getting a little dry and flakey, this is the mask for you!
Dry Skin Mask

Stress

Not only does stress complicate things in your life, it also complicates your skin! According to Dermalogica, heightened and continued stress levels can throw your adrenal glands into overdrive causing all of those annoying episodes that your skin keeps having. You clearly have enough stress, so stop stressing about your skin and try this mask!
Stressed Skin Mask

Diet

Although the connection between diet and the condition of our skin has not been proven, WebMD has talked to some dermatologists that beg to differ and have said that poor nutrition can lead to poor skin. That’s the plus side to the ingredients of this mask, they’re not only good for your skin but they’re also good for your diet!
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Change in Products

Your skin is a creature of habit. Most people think that just because it’s not going on their face that it won’t affect their skin, but that is not the case! Things like laundry detergent, perfume, and shampoo/conditioner can definitely affect your skin. It’s okay though, pumpkin can solve all your problems. From pumpkin spice lattes to this pumpkin mask, you simply can’t go wrong with pumpkin.
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Age

We know that this is something you don’t want to admit but, unfortunately, skin is one of the many things that can change with age. It’s okay though we can keep this one our little secret, just use this mask and keep telling everyone that you’re not a day over 20.
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What are some of your DIY skincare secrets? Tell us in the comments!
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Do you love doing at-home facials for you and your friends? Maybe it’s time to turn your hobby into a career! Check out our Esthetics Program and see if a career in esthetics is right for you!

Shop Alert: Boscia Luminizing Black Mask

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose is excited to learned about Boscia Luminizing Black Mask. We can’t wait to try this mask, not only does it have amazing ingredients  like, Calcium Montmorillonite Clay which was “First discovered in Montmorillion, France in the 1800s, and considered the premier quality clay containing 67 minerals” (Boscia.com), and  Maritime Pine Bark Extract  ” Improves skin elasticity and hydration, helping to prevent the first signs of aging” (Boscia.com). To use the mask is pretty easy, checkout the directions listed on their website. Apply a thick, opaque, even layer to clean, dry skin. Avoid eye area, eyebrows, hairline and lips. Leave on for 30 minutes or until completely dry. Gently peel off mask from outer edges and rinse off any residue. Follow with moisturizer. Use once or twice a week (Boscia). To see the mask in action check out the video below. Happy masking!