Makeup News:Elf On A Shelf Eyeliner!

 

 

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We’ve already tried candy cane and Tiffany & Co bow-inspired eyeliner art ideas, and makeup guru Meghan Rusk is giving us new inspiration on Instagram. Via her handle phunky_town, Meghan is showing off some serious drawing skills. She has used makeup to create unique Winter and holiday motifs on her eyelids, including snowflakes, bells, bows, and — our favorite — an Elf on a Shelf!

“I love creating liner looks, and the holiday season is my favorite time of the year,” Meghan told POPSUGAR via email. “I leave the decorating around the house until last minute to avoid my pets from tearing them down, which bums me out. I decided I would combine my passion for makeup and the love of the holiday season to create fun looks to make up for the lack of holiday decorations around my home.”

Obviously we needed to know more specifics about the Elf on a Shelf look. “My family never took part in the Elf on the Shelf activities,” she said. “I didn’t know what it was until a few years ago when my friends, who have children, posted daily updates on the ‘trouble’ the Elf has caused around their home. I figured it would be a fun way to spice up a liner look for the holiday season.”

Good news is, Meghan says you can totally try these ideas at home! “One tip I have for people who want to try creative liner at home is to keep practicing and be patient!” she said. “There are days where I have to redo my makeup four times to get it right! You will be frustrated at times and want to give up, but don’t. Once you nail it, you will be so happy that your hard work paid off.” Well, hers certainly did!

Hair News: Drink your way to perfect hair!

 

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The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology and skin care school in San Jose, loves to learn all the newest Kardashion klan beauty tips, and Kourtney has a new one for us. Check out the article below by Deena Campbell of Allure magazine.com

BY DEENA CAMPBELL

Aside from my morning tea, one thing that gets me going in the morning is avocado toast. Who doesn’t love avocados drizzled with olive oil and sesame seeds? Enter the Kourtney Kardashian avocado hair smoothie, a concoction her hairstylist, Andrew Fitzsimons, who has also styled Ashley Graham, Joan Smalls, and Hailey Baldwin, discovered when caring for her hair. The smoothie isn’t your typical sweet, fruit-based blend; it’s a mixture of honey, lemon juice, and avocados that you don’t drink but simply apply to your scalp and hair.

“I was intrigued by the smoothies that she was drinking, and I created a hair smoothie, an avocado hair smoothie,” says Fitzsimons on kourtneykardashian.com. “It’s a natural detangler.”

We all know that avocados are superfoods that keep our skin glowing, but who knew that mixing them with lemon (which is a great remedy for dandruff, by the way), olive oil, and honey would combat dull hair?

Fascinated? It’s easy. Here’s the recipe for the Kourtney Kardashian avocado hair smoothie: Just mix 1 1/2 avocados with 2 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons of manuka honey, and the juice of ½ a lemon. Blend until smooth, about 30 seconds. Finally, comb the mixture through your hair and let it sit for 45 minutes covered.

We can’t promise instant results or that you’ll look exactly like Kourtney Kardashian, but using the concoction over time should add moisture and the shine to your hair that you’ve been dying for. Watch the entire video on Kourtney’s website and then head to your nearest blender.


 

Makeup News: Drug Store Makeup Super Stars!

 

The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a cosmetology and esthetics school loves learning new makeup hacks, and we have a great one for you. Check out the article below about this new amazing all in on product by Physicians Formula!

BY CHANTEL MOREL

Last night’s AMAs was full of surprises, including an appearance by Selena Gomez, a toned-down Lady Gaga look, and an unexpected downpour that almost flooded the red carpet. Luckily, when the weather throws an unwanted curve ball, pros like makeup artist Mary Phillips come prepared with a bag full of tips, tricks, and of course, products. To ensure client Chrissy Teigen’s eye shadow didn’t come right off when she stepped outside, Phillips needed an eye-shadow base to lock the pigments in place. What she reached for, however, wasn’t an eye-shadow base—it was a contouring stick.

Moments before Teigen stepped onto the red carpet, Phillips posted a picture on her Instagram of the Physician’s Formula Super BB #InstaReady ContourTrio Stick in Bronze Trio. “I’m very into off-label use btw,” she wrote in the caption. “This Physician’s Formula Contour Stick? No no, that’s my sexy new eye-shadow base, especially in this rain!”

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“It’s funny because I’m not even the biggest fan of bases and primers, but when I started messing around with the Physician’s Formula Contour Stick, the night before, I was really intrigued A) by the color selection, and B) by the texture. It was flat but not matte,and silky but not transparent.” Often eye-shadow bases can rest pretty heavy on the eyes, but after playing around with the contour stick, Phillips found the formula to be comfortable and moisturizing. More importantly, it didn’t crease, which is super important if you want your eye shadow to last, especially on muggy days. After a day of testing it out on herself, Phillips decided it was good enough to be put to the ultimate test—the red-carpet step-and-repeat.

Aside from creating a smooth base to seamlessly blend eye shadows, Phillips discovered this little beauty stick had several other uses as well. “I would even just wear this alone on the eyes too,” she said. “I like that it’s an easily portable product, and you can use it for contour, on your cheeks and eyes, and even on your lips—maybe not the lightest color, but the middle caramel color would work, and the darkest color could easily be pulled off on someone with a deeper skin tone.” The makeup artist also adds that the contour stick does have a light shimmer, but it’s not overwhelming or garish.

Makeup News: Roll Me In Fairydust & Call Me A Unicorn!

 

 

 

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When Unicorn Lashes originally came out with unicorn-inspired makeup brushes earlier this year, beauty junkies everywhere collectively shed glittery tears of joy. And now, the magical tools will soon come in your favorite metallic finish — rose gold.

It comes as no surprise that two huge beauty trends are joining forces in the most magical way. Unicorns have been at the forefront of beauty trends this year inspiring everything from tattoos torainbow highlighters, while women have been flocking to their salons to try the rose gold hair color trend.

Unicorn Lashes’ original set of vegan Unicorn Brushes sold out twice this September in just 12 hours, so expect the rose gold set (available in 2017) to be hard to get your hands on.

The photos released of the new set feature bristles with deep red tips to match the rosy shade of the handles. It’s important to note that this might not be the final design of the rose gold collection. Mel Blue, the founder of Unicorn Lashes, revealed in an interview with Allure that she’s considering other designs including a combination of gray and pink bristles. If you can’t wait until 2017 to get some unicorn brushes, Unicorn Lashes will restock the original rainbow-bristled set in December.

CONTEMPORARY WATERCOLOR HAIR!

Here at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Academy in San Jose, we love us some watercolor tresses. You can find ladies of all ages rocking this trend! We came a across this fab article on Popsugar.com showcasing PRAVANA Artistic Color Director Vadre Grigsby, creating her version of the look. Check out the article below to learn more.

By now the image of a woman with rainbow, unicorn-like hair seems commonplace. The look has been trending on Instagram for a few years, but that doesn’t mean we are over it. And sometimes the classics — like watercolor-inspired locks — are still our favorites.

This video of Pravana Artistic Color Director Vader Grigsby creating the look on a blonde woman reminded us how pretty watercolor hair is. In the video, the technique was also explained in case you want to try it or tell your colorist how to do it.

Rainbow hues were applied horizontally to sections in random areas. Shades are layered in an artistic way. “This look is created visually and relies on subtle saturation of colors in varying shades,” the video caption states. The colorist continues to take sections and repeat this technique so the watercolors layer over each other.

Watch it to see this mesmerizing and gorgeous mermaid transformation!

It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

Station Special FX Makeup

Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist

The Lazy Girls Guide to Halloween Makeup

 

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose is excited for HALLOWEEN! Are you a Halloween fanatic, but simply do not have the time or energy this year to plan, organize, and execute a fab Halloween costume? Know worries! We have cultivated a few makeup looks that only require fifteen minutes, Black liquid eyeliner and your everyday beauty makeup to create these Halloween looks. Checkout some of the cut, sexy, and fun looks below.Have a safe and fun Halloween!

 

 

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Blend your makeup at sonic speed!

 

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose is excited to introduce you to SonicBlend makeup brushe. We stumbled across this amazing new makeup brush that blends your foundation, concealer and powder at sonic speeds, but the best part…. it is antimicrobial. Keep your acne at bay with this new must have makeup tool. Check out the article below by WENDY ROSE GOULD for Instyle.com

I am a huge fan of blending my makeup with my fingers. You see, I tend to reserve cosmetic brushes for my eyes and only reach for my beautyblender when Ireally need to. This is primarily because I feel like I have more control when using my hands, and because I worry about makeup brushes and tools getting dirty. Sure, I wash my brushes regularly, but you still never know…

What I’m trying to say is that techy beauty gadgets aren’t a huge part of my makeup routine. However, I think I’m slowly being taken to the other side of the fence—the side where cosmetic brushes are used on the regular—because of a new tool I picked up a couple months ago: Michael Todd Beauty’s SonicBlend Makeup Brush ($99, amazon.com). It sat in the package for several weeks on my desk, where it’d sometimes catch my eye and prompt me to consider freeing it from the box and give it a spin (literally) After one particularly lackluster Saturday morning, I finally did.

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The brush requires three hours of charge time, so I took a long bath, played with my cats, did some laundry and then stood in the mirror, brush poised for action, ready to see how it worked. It was kind of awkward at first, but within a minute or two I felt like I had a feel for it. I applied my bb cream with the brush on its highest pulse setting (of which there are three) and watched the makeup magically melt into my skin.

One of my favorite things about this tool is its ability to create a very thin, blended layer of makeup that provides coverage but doesn’t look caked on. Because of the three different settings, you can also control the coverage more easily than you can with your hands. For example, I sometimes need more coverage on my chin or upper cheeks if I’m dealing with a bit of hormonal acne, and I want something more gentle for the sensitive skin under my eyes.

Another cool thing about this brush is that you can use it for both powder and liquid makeup. After applying my bb cream, I like to use it to apply cream blush to the apples of my cheeks, and then I’ll go in with a tiny bit of powder highlighter and contour. It creates a seamlessly blended look for all the above, and everything looks and feels very even. You can also work it into crevices between your nose and eyes, and around your hairline and chin.

Let’s talk pricing. It’s definitely spendy at $99, and I normally wouldn’t pay that much for a tool, but IMO the price is justified by several factors.

First, it’s a multi-use tool that works for basically any makeup you’re going to apply to your face (save for eyeshadow, eyeliner, mascara, and lipstick). Also, it allows you to use less makeup than usual since it blends at up to 200 brush strokes per second, doesn’t stretch or rub the skin (it just floats and glides) and creates a finish that’s magazine cover-worthy.

Also, it’s antimicrobial, meaning it literally has built-in protection to prevent bacteria from festering on your brush. As a self-admitted germaphobe, that brings me great peace of mind. I do not like the idea of rubbing a bunch of germs all over my face. But really… who does?