Myth Busted: A Career In Cosmetology Can Be Lucrative & Rewarding!

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Thinking about becoming a hairstylist, but keep hearing your friends and family’s outdated opinion on the beauty industry! We know there is a lot of myths when it comes to working in the beauty industry, and  The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a Redken Diamond Academy is here to show you the light to a stylish career. We have educators from different aspects of the beauty industry, from runway makeup and hair, film, print media and working for top corporate companies. They will show you that you can be successful, but you need to ask yourself, how hard are you willing to work?  Take Ted Gibson, celebrity hairstylist and brand ambassador. He began his career with humble beginnings, and now he holds the world in his hands! Check out the top 4 beauty myths busted by Ted Gibson Below.

Top 4 Beauty Myths Busted By Ted Gibson

What about Earnings? My parents worried that I wouldn’t earn a nice living in the beauty business, but I’ve found there is no earnings cap. Like many careers, success as a hairstylist is based on desire and work ethic. You can use your beauty school license to work in a salon, start a small business or work in a corporate environment.

What’s the demand? As long as hair and fingernails continue to grow, there will be a need for beauty professionals. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists will increase by about 10 percent through 2024: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/barbers-hairdressers-and-cosmetologists.htm

Who hires beauty school graduates?Beauty careers are available in my hometown of Killeen, Texas, my adopted town of New York City and everywhere in between! Beauty careers can’t be sent offshore. You simply can’t get a facial on the Internet or a haircut from a call center. And salons are just one place where beauty professionals work. You’ll also find us in day spas, resorts, backstage at fashion and entertainment events, in product development labs and in publishing!

Making a Difference. What I love most about beauty is its transformative nature. I can change someone’s outlook with a great shampoo and massage. In my salon, I see beauty professionals changing people’s lives every day, and of course on TLC’s “What Not to Wear,” I work with other beauty professionals to help people reinvent their appearance and change their life every week.

Become a Hairstylist!

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The 4 Most Inspiring Books To Read in Cosmetology School!

The Educators at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond Academy in San Jose, love to inspire out students. We are always on the hunt for new techniques, looks and of course books! We asked our educators to list some of their favorite reads that have inspired them to grow as artists, and to create a career and life they love as hairstylists. Check out their top 4 books, some by the top salons owners in the country.

41umlraxpuLIt’s Not Really About the Hair

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Who Moved My Cheese

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Hair By Sam Mcknight

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Making Faces by Kevyn Aucoin

Are you ready to change your life and start working in a fun and stylish career as a cosmetologist?

Be sure to email as or give us a ring at (408) 579-9111 to set up your TSPA tour!

Must Have Hair Color Trends For Sping 2017

 

It is almost spring time in San Jose, California and that means it time to checkout all the newest hair color trends for spring 2017. The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond academy is known for teaching and create on trend hair coloring techniques. We thought we would share with you all the delicious hues that have been popping up on the runway and the beauty blogs. If your brave! Maybe try one for yourself, or even better, become a cosmetology student at The Salon Professional academy in San Jose and learn how to create these one of a kind hair color looks. Be sure to send us and email to set up your TSPA salon today!



Rose Gold

Classic, fun and on trend with the metal tone of the season.

Rose-Gold

 

Contoured Hair

Like the name states, this hair color will contour and high lite the shape of your face.

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Greenery

Dubbed the color of the year by Pantone. I know a little wild, but hey it is fun!

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A Smashing Career as a Hairstylist!!!!!!

Say it loud, and say it proud! You are starting on the path to becoming a hairstylist with the help of The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. You have made the decision to build a career and life you love, working in one of the fastest growing industries. In 2015 the industry generated $56.2 billion in the United States, and expected to keep growing over the next 10 years. With the glowing out look of this industry, only you can limit yourself.  As a licensed cosmetologist you can work in any of the following careers, and you can even work in more than one. Take a look at the list below, created  by The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, California.

 

So Many Career Paths As a Licensed Cosmetologist! 

Cosmetologist  Hairstylist, Barber, Hair Color Specialist, Perm Specialist, Esthetician, Nail Care Artists, Manicurist, Salon Owner, Salon Manager, Salon Coordinator, Salon Sales Consultant, Manufacturer Sales Representative, Makeup Artist, Director of Education, Distributor’s Sales Representative, Fashion Show Stylist, Photo and Movie Stylist, Platform Artist and Educator, Beauty Magazine Writer, Beauty Magazine Editor, Cosmetology School Owner, Cosmetology Instructor, Beauty Care Marketing, Salon Franchisee, Salon Chain Management, Beauty Care Distributor, Salon Computer Expert, Beauty Care PR Specialist, Research Chemist, Beauty Product Designer, Beauty Business Consultant, Trade Show Director, or Beauty School Owner.

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Beauty Industry Growth Facts

 

With the end of your senior year fast approaching, it is time to start making plans to start you stylish career as a cosmetologist with a FAB education at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. March 7th, 2017 is our next start date! Classes fill up fast! Be sure to send us an email or give us a ring ( 408-784-4463) to set up your tour. We look forward to seeing you at TSPA!

 

Makeup: Pretty & Flirty Valentine’s Day Makeup Look!

Yes! The most romantic day of the year is here. The Salon Professional Academy loves to celebrate Valentine’s Day. The flowers, candies and romantic dinners. But before you head out on your date night. Check out this uber chic Valentines day inspired makeup look by BeautifulYouTV. We are loving the detail work she did on the heart eyeliner. Feel the love and get inspired! Happy Valentines day!

 

Top 3 Reasons To Be A Cosmetologist!

Are you thinking about starting your career as a cosmetologist at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond Academy in San Jose? We asked our students to share some of their reasons why they decided to embark on The Salon professionals Academy’s 1600 hour cosmetology program.Check out what some of our student have to say below. When your ready to start your career, please give us a call at (408) 579-9111 or email us here. We look forward to seeing you at The Salon Professional Academy!

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  1. Create your own style: From classic city chic blowouts to the tossed waves of boho fab. You will learn all the current styles, and you will also be evolving to create you own style for your clients.
  2.  No glass ceiling: You can go from salon assistant, master colorist to global salon empire CEO. There is no glass ceiling in the beauty industry.
  3.  The love of Beauty: Seeing the creation and ideals of beauty constantly evolving.

Hair News: Princess Leia The Hair Icon!

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“I’d like to wear my old hairstyle again—but with white hair; I think that would be funny,” Carrie Fisher told TV Guide in 2014. And who could doubt the object of her amusement, those storied side-slung Princess Leia buns? In her long career, Fisher knew how to write and deliver a punch line. She also knew how to wear one, with a sly feminist twist. That first Princess Leia hairstyle, two enormous buns plastered on either side of her head, is arguably the most recognizable movie hairdo of the past 50 years. The look has ricocheted through the decades in comedy skits, Halloween costumes, online hairstyle tutorials, and mountains of Star Wars merch. In one episode of 30 Rock, Tina Fey as Liz Lemon wore the style in an effort to seem “crazy” and get out of jury duty (it didn’t work).

 

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But humor wasn’t always the point. Female empowerment takes many forms, and for many who relished the inclusion of a confident, brave, happily-single woman in the action movie oeuvre, it took the form—partially at least—of bodacious side buns. And some no doubt simply welcomed another choice at the party store that wasn’t quite as objectifying as bunny ears or a Wilma Flintstone wig. Who would choose to playact as a pin-up or a stone age wife when you could be the leader of the Rebel Alliance?

There’s a wide chasm between contemporary fashion and sci-fi costume fantasy. It would be a little disappointing if a heroine from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away had a chic bob or a ladylike French twist. Certainly, there are other crazy hairstyles in the film universe, but those buns stand out because they are at once simple and over-the-top. They’re also memorable and nearly impossible to overlook—both qualities more than a few feminist women, then or now, might aspire to. That contradiction, combined with Fisher’s campy delivery of some deeply cheesy lines—”Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi; you’re my only hope!”— made an indelible imprint on film hair-story.

The Princess Leia buns appeared in the first Star Wars movie in 1977. Lucas told Time magazine that he was “working very hard to create something that wasn’t fashion” with the overall look—specifically with Leia’s hair. This was a departure from B-movie sci-fi practice, where you’d often see huge ’60s bouffants or ’50s flips in outer space. (Spaceships must have some seriously talented intergalactic hairdressers on board.) “I went with a kind of southwestern Pancho Villa-woman revolutionary look,” Lucas said. “The buns are basically from turn-of-the-century Mexico.” Only trouble is, you can spend hours searching online photo archives (alas, I did) and still have absolutely no idea what he’s talking about. Perhaps by Pancho Villa he meant Leia’s revolutionary élan. And though much of this tribe is centered in northeastern Arizona, perhaps by “southwestern” he meant the Hopi people. The Hopi maiden “squash blossom” hairstyle bears a very strong resemblance to Leia’s oversized whorls (or rather the other way around).

This is not the only theory, of course. The Japanese Shimada chignon can have protuberances on each side. Vintage comic book images of Batgirl and Flash Gordan’s Queen Fria are another possible source of inspiration. And more recently, eagle-eyed viewers will have noticed a version of the side bun on the ladies of The Hollow Crown, a PBS mini-series of Shakespeare’s history plays. My money is on the squash blossom.


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Today, we hear “princess” and think of the Disney coterie—Sleeping Beauty, Belle, Jasmine, Ariel—swirling about in yards of pastel taffeta toward an inevitable destiny of landing a prince. Leia, in unruffled virginal white and those glorious buns, was a different kind of princess, an exemplar of first-wave feminism: a rebel wielding a blaster and mowing down Imperial Stormtroopers. A woman who, in the first movie at least, seems impatient and unimpressed with posturing males and is single-minded in her mission.

Still, there were chinks in her armor. That famous hairdo absurdly never seemed to move during multiple narrow escapes and scrapes with death. And, as Fisher cheekily wrote in her memoir The Princess Diarist, “Who wears that much lip gloss into battle?” She made it clear that she hated, yet still wore, that metallic gold bikini when she was enslaved to Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. Some parents were miffed that gold-bikini sex slave merchandise was still being marketed to kids, a controversy she didn’t tolerate, telling the Wall Street Journal that concerned parents could tell their kids that “a giant slug captured me and forced me to wear that stupid outfit, and then I killed him because I didn’t like it. And then I took it off. Backstage.”

For the entirety of her life, Fisher had an eye for the absurdities of moviemaking and fame that didn’t always jibe with feminist orthodoxies, but often did. “Please stop debating about whether or not I aged well, unfortunately it hurts all three of my feelings,” she tweeted last year. “My BODY hasn’t aged as well as I have.”

In another memoir, Wishful Drinking, Fisher recounted why she wasn’t allowed to wear a bra under Leia’s white dress. “There’s no underwear in space,” she recalled Lucas telling her. Puzzled, she asked him why, and he explained that in a weightless environment, your body would expand but your bra would not, so it would end up strangling you. “I think this would make for a fantastic obituary,” Fisher wrote. “I tell my younger friends that no matter how I go I want it reported that I drowned in moonlight, strangled by my own bra.”

And wearing those fantastic buns, no doubt.

Article BY DAVID DENICOLO

Start Your Aestheticians Training Today!

The Salon Professional Academy is known for educating top ranking skincare specialist in the San Jose and Bay Area.We focus on teaching clinical services like, PCA Sensi peel, Skin Scripts Enzymes and microdermabrasion. Have you ever thought about becoming an Esthetician, and wonder what it fully entails to become licensed?Check out the article below to learn more.

 

Through consultations and evaluations, estheticians determine the wants and needs of their clients, and then perform therapies, procedures, and treatments accordingly. Just a few of the esthetic therapies performed by state licensed estheticians include:

  • Waxing/threading/chemical depilatories to remove unwanted hair
  • Facials, exfoliations, and masks to improve skin tone, cleanse pores, and address skin that is oily, dry, acne-prone skin
  • Anti-aging treatments, such as laser therapies and chemical peels, to minimize or prevent fine lines and wrinkles
  • Microdermabrasion
  • Blackhead extraction
  • Wraps, sugar or salt scrubs, or moisturizing treatments for the body
  • Makeup application
  • Head, neck, and scalp massage

 

Esthetics programs, which are available through either dedicated schools of esthetics or schools of cosmetology, must meet the requirements set forth by each state’s board of cosmetology. Most states recognize esthetics programs that consist of 600 hours of coursework and practical training, although a number of states require more hours while others require significantly fewer. For example, esthetician license candidates in Wisconsin must complete a program that is at least 450 hours long, while candidates in Indiana must complete a program consisting of at least 700 hours.

Esthetics programs blend theory and practical study that will introduce students to everything from facials and makeup artistry to physiology and sanitation. These programs also include coursework that covers the business, ethics and professional standards of the esthetics industry.

Aspiring estheticians often select a program based on a number of factors, such as:

  • Price
  • Location
  • Class schedules
  • Part-time/evening/distance education options
  • Teaching philosophies
  • Class size

With the exception of Connecticut, which does not license estheticians, individuals practicing esthetics must be state licensed to do so. It is against the law to practice esthetics without a valid and current state license.

While some states use their own state-specific exams, many use the national esthetics examinations created by the National-Interstate Council on State Boards of Cosmetology (NIC).

Exploring Professional Opportunities in Esthetics
Estheticians may work in a number of settings, including full-service salons or spas, destination resorts/spas, cruise ships, esthetics salons or spas, wellness centers, and physician’s offices. Estheticians are also often found working alongside dermatologists and plastic surgeons in medical offices. Although esthetician services are not medical in nature, this type of partnership is often beneficial because estheticians can provide clients with procedures and therapies that complement medical treatments.

In spa settings, estheticians perform many treatments that are meant to relax and rejuvenate the client, as well as promote health and beautify the skin. For example, aromatherapy treatments using essential oils, herbs, and spices are very popular in day spas, resort spas, and the like.

Experienced estheticians also often go on to work as freelancers in the movie, television, fashion, and theater industries, and they often specialize their careers in niche industries, such as the lucrative bridal business. Most exciting, perhaps, is the fact that many estheticians become business owners themselves, opening salons, spas, or esthetics clinics of their own.

Looking to start your skincare training at The Salon Professional Academy? Please give us a ring at 408.579.9111  to schedule you tour today.

Article by http://www.estheticianedu.org/

Makeup News: IMATS IS COMING

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The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology school in San Jose is excited for the month of January, it is time for IMATS! Our very own Director of Operations, Mrs. Magdalena and Director of Education, Mrs. V are headed to L.A for IMATS. They are going to be meeting the top makeup artist in the industry, and one of the creme de la creme is Academy Award winning makeup artist Ve Neill. Check out the article below by  by VICTORIA STANELL.

 

 

What would you ask one of the world’s top movie makeup artists? Attendees at this year’s IMATS in Los Angeles had the opportunity to voice their questions to three-time Academy Award-winning makeup artist Ve Neill, who served as department head for this year’s Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.

Neill, whose legendary hands helped transform films such as Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, Mrs. Doubtfire, and the Pirates of the Caribbean, is currently a judge on SyFy’s special effects makeup competition Face Off, and is re-launching her brush line “Ve’s Favourite Brushes” after a two-and-a-half year development phase. Hearing her tips, tricks, and stories up close is one of the biggest beauty fan girl moments we’ve ever experienced. And no territory went uncharted—Ve imparted her no-nonsense advice to fledgling artists on everything from attitude on set, the one foundation she can’t stop using, and the number one mistake young makeup artists make. These are the bits of wisdom we captured.

On drawing the line between pretty and ugly [for “The Hunger Games”]…

“It’s a movie. The directors and producers say ‘no, we don’t want it to be ugly, we want her to be pretty.’ You do the best you can, you make them look the way you believe—if they say it’s too much, then it’s too much. You are the tool of the director, and if the director doesn’t want you to make them look ugly, then by gosh you better not. Yes, she can be cut up but we want her to be pretty. After all, they are selling tickets. With Hunger Games, it’s a fantasy. You have to fight your battles.”

On her current favorite foundation…

“I love Make Up For Ever HD Foundation. I use it on almost everything now. I like it because there’s a lot of pigment, it can thin out, it holds up well, and is easy to repair. I used it exclusively on Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.”

On hiring a makeup PA…

“There’s a lot of gofering on set, stuff that has nothing to do with makeup application. Instead of hiring an actual artist, I will hire a PA. Most shows have a budget that allows me to hire PAs with very minimal pay. The very first intern/PA I ever had in 1998 is now a member of 706 [a local makeup union]. This is another way for you to get in and meet people. I’m not the only one who does it. Every department head in 706 will always hire a makeup PA.”

On the biggest lesson she’s ever learned in her career…

“Never leave town without your makeup assistant. I have gone on location without my people and it’s been horrible. They know how you work.”

On taking jobs…

“This is for you working artists: NEVER TURN DOWN A JOB. I don’t care if they tell you they’ll pay you in gas money. Take the money, put it in your car, and get over there. Because you never know who you’re going to meet. You can go to a job, work for free, kill yourself, and wow—you just met the person that’s going to give you your next job. Or you can sit at home and drink a beer. What would you rather be doing? You need the experience, you need to get out there and practice. You need to get out on a set and see what it’s like to work as a team member. It’s very important to have all that in your basket. Everyone works differently—all productions, producers, and production managers are different. You have to learn how to deal with these people.”

On school vs. real-world experience…

“It’s definitely important to get an education now. Makeup has advanced by leaps and bounds, and there are so many products out there and so many different ways to do things. Plus, there are a lot of good schools now. I’m self taught—when I started there were no schools for me! There was one beauty school called Elegance, and they had a mini course on effects but I went and did it myself. Schools are pricey, but you have to consider what it’s going to give you. Your competition is going to school. Your competition will have all that knowledge; do you want to be without it? I don’t think so. You’ll be introduced to products, how to use them properly, and how to take care of your equipment.”

On what’s currently in her kit…

“I use a lot of La Mer because it’s a big name and actors love it. My favorite skin care is made by Natura Bissé, which is dreadfully expensive but amazing. Embryolisse also makes great stuff. I use a lot of MAC skin care for guys that don’t want to mess around, and wipes from L’Oréal because they take off my eye makeup lickety split. For prosthetics, I’ll always clean the face with Kiehl’s Blue Astringent, then I’ll do applications with adhesives.

On letting actors leave makeup on…

“It’s really important that your actors do not leave the set with their makeup on. They go out to eat, get lazy, then go to sleep with the makeup on. Skin care is a really important part of a makeup artist’s job, because how they come back to you the next day is your fault if they’re covered in pimples or dry patches. I always put a skin care kit together for my makeup artists for every actor to take home. On the set of Hunger Games, I would use a galvanic wand treatment on the kids; in many cases a lot of the young skin really improved from doing those treatments.”

On what you can’t teach in makeup school…

“What most kids are lacking is obviously experience, something you only really get by trial and error. Experience is what teaches us our craft. I think those are the things you can’t really teach people in school. Also, set etiquette is really difficult to learn. I didn’t know what I was doing the first time I showed up on set. Who are these people? What do they do? Learn the roles.”

On burning bridges…

“Always take the high road, guys. Never burn a bridge—you don’t know when you will see that person next. Always be pleasant to everybody, because you might work with that same person someplace else. I make it a habit never to be unpleasant to anybody—you never know whose daughter they are, whose boyfriend they are, or who they’re married to.”

On knowing it all…

“As far as I’m concerned, if you are a makeup artist you damn better know how to do it all, because if you’re going to work on movies there are no ‘categories’ for artists. If you’re in movies you have to do it all. If you’re going to work for me you have to do it all. There are a lot of people who only specialize in special effects or glamour makeup, and that’s all they’ll ever be hired for. But a good, rounded makeup artist should never put themselves in a box.”

On staying honest…

“Don’t lie. Don’t start putting your name on shit you didn’t do—really, you don’t need to. Get your test makeups on your resume or your blog, but don’t take credit for other people’s work because someone will bitch-slap you good. Be honest about your resume, try to keep it to what you’ve actually done. If you were background on something, just write “BG”—there’s nothing wrong in saying you were in the bullpen doing background on a movie. Nobody likes a liar.”

On the one technique that’s hard to master…

“Good ‘dirty’ is hard to do. You’ve got to make it look like its ground in, like it’s been there. Everyone in Hunger Games was dirty, even if didn’t look like they were—but the beauty is in the subtle things. If they weren’t dirtied up they’d look spanking clean and weird. Practice good dirt.”

Create A Business And Life You Love! Become A Cosmetologist @ TSPA

TSPA San Jose Tour

Are you thinking about becoming a licensed cosmetologist with the help of The San professional Academy in San Jose? Once you complete your cosmetology hours at The Salon Professionally Academy, and pass your stare board test, you can choose to be a makeup artist to a socialite. The next Kate Sommerville with a global skincare line, or be backstage at a fashion show creating ad campaign worthy hairstyles. The Salon Professional Academy is the number one cosmetology and skincare school in San Jose and Bay Area, and we want you to create a business and life you love! Check out the article below by Marie Huntington of Chron.com

Makeup Artists

Makeup artists work with colors to apply makeup products to their clients, including lip glosses, eye shadows and facial foundations. Some makeup artists are qualified to provide skin care treatments to their clients using facial cleansers, moisturizers and oils. They also provide consultations regarding the application of makeup and recommend products and makeup colors to clients.

Hair Stylists

The hair stylist occupation may be the most well-known career in cosmetology. Hair stylists help their clients maintain the vitality of their hair. They are skilled at creating hairstyles for clients and ensuring the upkeep of hairstyles for ongoing clientele. Some hair stylists provide consultations in hair colors, hairstyles and hair care. Barbers are also licensed cosmetologists, but their duties consist of offering haircuts and facial trims. However, many barbers are qualified to perform other hair care practices similar to hair stylists, such as shampooing and coloring hair.

Nail Technicians

Nail technicians perform treatments of the hands, nails and feet. These treatments generally include various types of manicures, pedicures, aromatherapy treatments and massages of the hands and feet. In addition to providing care and maintenance to the hands, nails and feet, nail technicians also apply synthetic nails and polishing agents for their clients.

Estheticians

Estheticians perform skin care treatments, massages and hair removal treatment. Estheticians are licensed cosmetologists, and their procedures entail using cleansing agents, lotions, body oils and other skin care products to help beautify and maintain the skin care of their clients. Estheticians also provide consultations and recommend treatments to their clients. However, estheticians are not qualified to diagnose and treat skin disorders and other skin-related ailments.

Tip

Most cosmetology programs take one to two years to complete, and aspiring licensed cosmetologists are typically required to choose a cosmetology specialty as their career focus. Because of the continuous changes in fashion trends, cosmetologists must continue to upgrade their skills to meet the demands of diverse clientele. To become successful in the cosmetology occupation, individuals must possess interpersonal communication skills to attract and retain ongoing clients.