Myth Busted: A Career In Cosmetology Can Be Lucrative & Rewarding!

Ted+Gibson+Carlos+Campos+Backstage+Fall+09+M1RmSHnJ6ttl

Thinking about becoming a hairstylist, but keep hearing your friends and family’s outdated opinion on the beauty industry! We know there is a lot of myths when it comes to working in the beauty industry, and  The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a Redken Diamond Academy is here to show you the light to a stylish career. We have educators from different aspects of the beauty industry, from runway makeup and hair, film, print media and working for top corporate companies. They will show you that you can be successful, but you need to ask yourself, how hard are you willing to work?  Take Ted Gibson, celebrity hairstylist and brand ambassador. He began his career with humble beginnings, and now he holds the world in his hands! Check out the top 4 beauty myths busted by Ted Gibson Below.

Top 4 Beauty Myths Busted By Ted Gibson

What about Earnings? My parents worried that I wouldn’t earn a nice living in the beauty business, but I’ve found there is no earnings cap. Like many careers, success as a hairstylist is based on desire and work ethic. You can use your beauty school license to work in a salon, start a small business or work in a corporate environment.

What’s the demand? As long as hair and fingernails continue to grow, there will be a need for beauty professionals. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists will increase by about 10 percent through 2024: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/barbers-hairdressers-and-cosmetologists.htm

Who hires beauty school graduates?Beauty careers are available in my hometown of Killeen, Texas, my adopted town of New York City and everywhere in between! Beauty careers can’t be sent offshore. You simply can’t get a facial on the Internet or a haircut from a call center. And salons are just one place where beauty professionals work. You’ll also find us in day spas, resorts, backstage at fashion and entertainment events, in product development labs and in publishing!

Making a Difference. What I love most about beauty is its transformative nature. I can change someone’s outlook with a great shampoo and massage. In my salon, I see beauty professionals changing people’s lives every day, and of course on TLC’s “What Not to Wear,” I work with other beauty professionals to help people reinvent their appearance and change their life every week.

Become a Hairstylist!

Enroll Today

What Will You Study In The Cosmetology Course At The Salon Professional Academy!

From you first day clocking in at 0 hours at The Salon Professionally Academy in San Jose, cosmetology and skincare school. Until the moment you complete your 1600 hours of cosmetology training, you will be learning the six important pillars of cosmetology from our award winning Redken educators!  Now I know you can’t contain your excitement, as you start learning about all The Salon Professional Academy has to offer. So I am going to give you a sneak peak of a few of our lessons.

 

Hair Cutting

We are currently teaching the most sought after haircuts, the Lob and asymmetrical bob. You can see Cara Delevingne working the Lob A.K.A the long bob.

gettyimages-585722444-cara-delevingne-lob

 


Coloring

Color Melt: Using multiple colors to created a melted effect

download (1)

Color Block: Panels of color that change with your hair movement.

download (2)

Baby Lights: Very small delicate highlights to give that soft halo hair glow, t most often seen on small children.

6f89d5cd6fab15da38c5f271b5052f8e


Hair Analysis

Natural texture: How to work with your clients natural texture to give them an easy a customized hair style.


Texture services

Keratin Treatment: A semi-permanent hair straightening method done by temporarily sealing a liquid keratin and a preservative solution into the hair with a hair iron.

Acid Cold Wave Perm: Give your client a soft curl pattern to always have ready to wear beach waves.

download (3)


Salon Management

Customer Service: How to keep your client happy and loyal to you!

happy-client1

Both or Commission: Work for yourself or grow with an established salon!

download (5)


Basic Chemistry

download (6)

PH Scale: A measure of acidity or alkalinity of water soluble substances (pH stands for ‘potential of Hydrogen’). A pHvalue is a number from 1 to 14, with 7 as the middle (neutral) point. Values below 7 indicate acidity which increases as the number decreases, 1 being the most acidic. Important to know when prescribing products to your clients and choosing the right chemical service for their hair type.

Infection Control: Infection control is the discipline concerned with preventing nosocomial or healthcare-associated infection, a practical (rather than academic) sub-discipline of epidemiology.


Skincare

skincare-livermore

Basic Facial: Learn the basic of cleansing, exfoliating and moisturizer to keep your clients skin in tip top shape for makeup

Skin Structure: Learn how the skin works and how to start slowing down the again process with anti again techniques.

Now that you have gotten a sneak peak at our cosmetology program, I am sure you are ready to come visit TSPA to take a tour! Please be sure to give us a call at  (408) 579-9111 or email us here! We will see you soon and welcome to a stylish career!

 

Hair News: Thinking about going platinum ? What you need to know!

how-dye-asian-hair-blond

 

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology school in San Jose is known for creating Instagram worthy blondes, but do you know what it fully entails going blonde? Check out the article below from Popsugar.com and some awesome quotes by our very own Miss. Natalie on the subject.

The night before my first appointment at Sally Hershberger Downtown, I examined my dark mane closer than I ever have in all my years as an Asian (that’s a lot of years). The way the small lamp on my nightstand bounced off my crown, creating a half-circle glow that starkly contrasted with my black hair, like a halo above my visage, almost moved me to tears. Was I getting cold feet? Maybe. Was I being dramatic? If you say so. But what was certain was that I was going to miss my natural hair color. We’d never been apart from each other before (aside from a failed at-home bleaching attempt at age 13), not even for a Clairol Summer fling.

 

“Will your hair stay attached during the process.”

-Miss Natalie cosmetology teacher at The Salon Professional Academy, San Jose.

 

Luckily, the trepidatious moment was fleeting and I quickly remembered my mission. I was going to become a completely different person the next day. Tomorrow, I would start my two-session transformation from a regular ol’ Asian to a platinum blond one, which, barring cosmetic surgery, is probably the most dramatic change an Asian girl can make. Sure, only my hair was being overhauled, but it does make up about 40 percent of me.

Since childhood, I’ve marveled at the likes of Debbie Harry, then Courtney Love, followed by perennial platinum Gwen Stefani, and most recently Sky Ferreira. I’ve been coveting their punk-inspired, white-blond manes as something I could only ever dream about, but never have. But as hair technology continued to advance, something miraculous happened: Asian women, who for the most part had only been able to go orange, started to go platinum successfully.

 

“Some type of treatment is a must for hair levels 1 – 5.”

-Miss Natalie cosmetology teacher at The Salon Professional Academy, San Jose

Models Soo Joo Park, Ai Tominaga, and Daul Kim (RIP) set a new bar in the fashion industry by going platinum. Fashion host Amy Pham helped introduce the look to a more mainstream audience, and now throngs of regular Asian girls who had similar dreams of experiencing the yin to their hair yang are following suit. And I was next in line. As quickly as it came, my apprehension evaporated and once again I was eager to finally fulfill a lifelong dream. Only one more night of sleep stood in my way.

Having said all that, going from black to platinum is no joke. It is a serious process. When I met with my brilliant, sweet, devastatingly handsome colorist, Daniel Sanchez (who has worked on Karlie Kloss’s mane) at Sally Hershberger for our consultation, he immediately assessed that making my hair platinum would take two sessions and at least eight hours.

After experiencing what ended up being 15 hours total in the salon chair, I can say with confidence that the longer the process, the better the results. Unless you want your hair to go into shock and become straw or, even worse, fall out in clumps, you’ll want your colorist to take his or her time and go as gently as possible on your strands. So, armed with my cell phone charger and a pantry of snacks (crackers, pretzels, hummus, beef jerky, and Kind bars), I ventured to Sally Hershberger the next day poised and ready to go platinum.

If you, too, are considering stepping into the light, but are still trepidatious of the process, keep reading to discover exactly what to expect during a black-to-platinum hair color transformation.

Makeup News: IMATS IS COMING

orig

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology school in San Jose is excited for the month of January, it is time for IMATS! Our very own Director of Operations, Mrs. Magdalena and Director of Education, Mrs. V are headed to L.A for IMATS. They are going to be meeting the top makeup artist in the industry, and one of the creme de la creme is Academy Award winning makeup artist Ve Neill. Check out the article below by  by VICTORIA STANELL.

 

 

What would you ask one of the world’s top movie makeup artists? Attendees at this year’s IMATS in Los Angeles had the opportunity to voice their questions to three-time Academy Award-winning makeup artist Ve Neill, who served as department head for this year’s Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.

Neill, whose legendary hands helped transform films such as Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, Mrs. Doubtfire, and the Pirates of the Caribbean, is currently a judge on SyFy’s special effects makeup competition Face Off, and is re-launching her brush line “Ve’s Favourite Brushes” after a two-and-a-half year development phase. Hearing her tips, tricks, and stories up close is one of the biggest beauty fan girl moments we’ve ever experienced. And no territory went uncharted—Ve imparted her no-nonsense advice to fledgling artists on everything from attitude on set, the one foundation she can’t stop using, and the number one mistake young makeup artists make. These are the bits of wisdom we captured.

On drawing the line between pretty and ugly [for “The Hunger Games”]…

“It’s a movie. The directors and producers say ‘no, we don’t want it to be ugly, we want her to be pretty.’ You do the best you can, you make them look the way you believe—if they say it’s too much, then it’s too much. You are the tool of the director, and if the director doesn’t want you to make them look ugly, then by gosh you better not. Yes, she can be cut up but we want her to be pretty. After all, they are selling tickets. With Hunger Games, it’s a fantasy. You have to fight your battles.”

On her current favorite foundation…

“I love Make Up For Ever HD Foundation. I use it on almost everything now. I like it because there’s a lot of pigment, it can thin out, it holds up well, and is easy to repair. I used it exclusively on Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.”

On hiring a makeup PA…

“There’s a lot of gofering on set, stuff that has nothing to do with makeup application. Instead of hiring an actual artist, I will hire a PA. Most shows have a budget that allows me to hire PAs with very minimal pay. The very first intern/PA I ever had in 1998 is now a member of 706 [a local makeup union]. This is another way for you to get in and meet people. I’m not the only one who does it. Every department head in 706 will always hire a makeup PA.”

On the biggest lesson she’s ever learned in her career…

“Never leave town without your makeup assistant. I have gone on location without my people and it’s been horrible. They know how you work.”

On taking jobs…

“This is for you working artists: NEVER TURN DOWN A JOB. I don’t care if they tell you they’ll pay you in gas money. Take the money, put it in your car, and get over there. Because you never know who you’re going to meet. You can go to a job, work for free, kill yourself, and wow—you just met the person that’s going to give you your next job. Or you can sit at home and drink a beer. What would you rather be doing? You need the experience, you need to get out there and practice. You need to get out on a set and see what it’s like to work as a team member. It’s very important to have all that in your basket. Everyone works differently—all productions, producers, and production managers are different. You have to learn how to deal with these people.”

On school vs. real-world experience…

“It’s definitely important to get an education now. Makeup has advanced by leaps and bounds, and there are so many products out there and so many different ways to do things. Plus, there are a lot of good schools now. I’m self taught—when I started there were no schools for me! There was one beauty school called Elegance, and they had a mini course on effects but I went and did it myself. Schools are pricey, but you have to consider what it’s going to give you. Your competition is going to school. Your competition will have all that knowledge; do you want to be without it? I don’t think so. You’ll be introduced to products, how to use them properly, and how to take care of your equipment.”

On what’s currently in her kit…

“I use a lot of La Mer because it’s a big name and actors love it. My favorite skin care is made by Natura Bissé, which is dreadfully expensive but amazing. Embryolisse also makes great stuff. I use a lot of MAC skin care for guys that don’t want to mess around, and wipes from L’Oréal because they take off my eye makeup lickety split. For prosthetics, I’ll always clean the face with Kiehl’s Blue Astringent, then I’ll do applications with adhesives.

On letting actors leave makeup on…

“It’s really important that your actors do not leave the set with their makeup on. They go out to eat, get lazy, then go to sleep with the makeup on. Skin care is a really important part of a makeup artist’s job, because how they come back to you the next day is your fault if they’re covered in pimples or dry patches. I always put a skin care kit together for my makeup artists for every actor to take home. On the set of Hunger Games, I would use a galvanic wand treatment on the kids; in many cases a lot of the young skin really improved from doing those treatments.”

On what you can’t teach in makeup school…

“What most kids are lacking is obviously experience, something you only really get by trial and error. Experience is what teaches us our craft. I think those are the things you can’t really teach people in school. Also, set etiquette is really difficult to learn. I didn’t know what I was doing the first time I showed up on set. Who are these people? What do they do? Learn the roles.”

On burning bridges…

“Always take the high road, guys. Never burn a bridge—you don’t know when you will see that person next. Always be pleasant to everybody, because you might work with that same person someplace else. I make it a habit never to be unpleasant to anybody—you never know whose daughter they are, whose boyfriend they are, or who they’re married to.”

On knowing it all…

“As far as I’m concerned, if you are a makeup artist you damn better know how to do it all, because if you’re going to work on movies there are no ‘categories’ for artists. If you’re in movies you have to do it all. If you’re going to work for me you have to do it all. There are a lot of people who only specialize in special effects or glamour makeup, and that’s all they’ll ever be hired for. But a good, rounded makeup artist should never put themselves in a box.”

On staying honest…

“Don’t lie. Don’t start putting your name on shit you didn’t do—really, you don’t need to. Get your test makeups on your resume or your blog, but don’t take credit for other people’s work because someone will bitch-slap you good. Be honest about your resume, try to keep it to what you’ve actually done. If you were background on something, just write “BG”—there’s nothing wrong in saying you were in the bullpen doing background on a movie. Nobody likes a liar.”

On the one technique that’s hard to master…

“Good ‘dirty’ is hard to do. You’ve got to make it look like its ground in, like it’s been there. Everyone in Hunger Games was dirty, even if didn’t look like they were—but the beauty is in the subtle things. If they weren’t dirtied up they’d look spanking clean and weird. Practice good dirt.”

Create A Business And Life You Love! Become A Cosmetologist @ TSPA

TSPA San Jose Tour

Are you thinking about becoming a licensed cosmetologist with the help of The San professional Academy in San Jose? Once you complete your cosmetology hours at The Salon Professionally Academy, and pass your stare board test, you can choose to be a makeup artist to a socialite. The next Kate Sommerville with a global skincare line, or be backstage at a fashion show creating ad campaign worthy hairstyles. The Salon Professional Academy is the number one cosmetology and skincare school in San Jose and Bay Area, and we want you to create a business and life you love! Check out the article below by Marie Huntington of Chron.com

Makeup Artists

Makeup artists work with colors to apply makeup products to their clients, including lip glosses, eye shadows and facial foundations. Some makeup artists are qualified to provide skin care treatments to their clients using facial cleansers, moisturizers and oils. They also provide consultations regarding the application of makeup and recommend products and makeup colors to clients.

Hair Stylists

The hair stylist occupation may be the most well-known career in cosmetology. Hair stylists help their clients maintain the vitality of their hair. They are skilled at creating hairstyles for clients and ensuring the upkeep of hairstyles for ongoing clientele. Some hair stylists provide consultations in hair colors, hairstyles and hair care. Barbers are also licensed cosmetologists, but their duties consist of offering haircuts and facial trims. However, many barbers are qualified to perform other hair care practices similar to hair stylists, such as shampooing and coloring hair.

Nail Technicians

Nail technicians perform treatments of the hands, nails and feet. These treatments generally include various types of manicures, pedicures, aromatherapy treatments and massages of the hands and feet. In addition to providing care and maintenance to the hands, nails and feet, nail technicians also apply synthetic nails and polishing agents for their clients.

Estheticians

Estheticians perform skin care treatments, massages and hair removal treatment. Estheticians are licensed cosmetologists, and their procedures entail using cleansing agents, lotions, body oils and other skin care products to help beautify and maintain the skin care of their clients. Estheticians also provide consultations and recommend treatments to their clients. However, estheticians are not qualified to diagnose and treat skin disorders and other skin-related ailments.

Tip

Most cosmetology programs take one to two years to complete, and aspiring licensed cosmetologists are typically required to choose a cosmetology specialty as their career focus. Because of the continuous changes in fashion trends, cosmetologists must continue to upgrade their skills to meet the demands of diverse clientele. To become successful in the cosmetology occupation, individuals must possess interpersonal communication skills to attract and retain ongoing clients.

Makeup News: Silicone! Out of the body, and now a staple in your makeup kit!

It’s an age-old makeup question: how do you apply makeup without wasting a ton of product? When you apply foundation with an ordinary sponge or brush, a portion of the makeup gets absorbed into the tool, draining your precious formula — and your money — faster.

The Silisponge by Molly Cosmetics ($9) has solved this issue completely. The Silisponge is a silicone makeup applicator that doesn’t absorb any of the product while seamlessly blending your makeup. The tool, which looks strikingly similar to a breast implant (or at the very least, a push-up bra insert), is an especially ideal option for makeup artists. That’s because it’s easy to clean, sterilize, and reuse within minutes, without the inconvenient drying time of a sponge.

Since its release earlier this week, it’s already sold out three times, but you can preorder the next restock, which will arrive Dec. 20. For half the price of high-end beauty sponges, it’s definitely worth giving a try. Read on to see the quirky tool in action.

Makeup News: Roll Me In Fairydust & Call Me A Unicorn!

 

 

 

screen%20shot%202016-11-10%20at%2012-36-44%20pm

 

When Unicorn Lashes originally came out with unicorn-inspired makeup brushes earlier this year, beauty junkies everywhere collectively shed glittery tears of joy. And now, the magical tools will soon come in your favorite metallic finish — rose gold.

It comes as no surprise that two huge beauty trends are joining forces in the most magical way. Unicorns have been at the forefront of beauty trends this year inspiring everything from tattoos torainbow highlighters, while women have been flocking to their salons to try the rose gold hair color trend.

Unicorn Lashes’ original set of vegan Unicorn Brushes sold out twice this September in just 12 hours, so expect the rose gold set (available in 2017) to be hard to get your hands on.

The photos released of the new set feature bristles with deep red tips to match the rosy shade of the handles. It’s important to note that this might not be the final design of the rose gold collection. Mel Blue, the founder of Unicorn Lashes, revealed in an interview with Allure that she’s considering other designs including a combination of gray and pink bristles. If you can’t wait until 2017 to get some unicorn brushes, Unicorn Lashes will restock the original rainbow-bristled set in December.

Makeup News: The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color

 

 

enhanced-9396-1454721021-2

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is a lover of Instagram makeup style. Who doesn’t love, those bold brows,  pouty lips and fleek eye shadow looks. We came across a new trend all over our favorite beauty instagramers, and it is all about The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color. Check out the article below by: 

 

 

pink-eye-shadow-ideas

Scroll through your Instagram feed (if you follow a lot of beauty bloggers!), and one thing should be apparent: pink eye is rampant! The Barbie-inspired eye color may seem unexpected for Fall (when dark colors usually reign supreme), but it’s definitely a spreading movement. Think of it as a nod to October sunsets, Autumn leaves, and the flush you get from being in the cold air too long. We love it for holiday party makeup, a wedding look, or workwear.

“A playful and pretty pop of pink shadow can work to instantly brighten your look,” Kelli J. Bartlett, Director of Makeup Artistry at Glamsquad, told POPSUGAR. “This trend has a youthful and energetic quality that can look dreamy or dramatic, depending on the shade and application you choose.”

So let’s talk about how to find the right pink so you look sick not sickly. In general, Bartlett believes all skin tones can rock a pink shadow, and the best way to find yours is trial and error. “When finding the right type of pink (cool or warm), you should consider your overall coloring (hair color, complexion, and eye color) as this will inform the type of pink that complements you best,” she said. “Rich raspberries look amazing on deeper tones, while light blush can look gorgeous on fair skin.”

She also has a hack if you’re not ready to buy a pink palette, but still looking to experiment. “For those who aren’t ready for hot pinky pink, pop your favorite blush color on your eye,” she advised. “You can also test the trend by dabbing some of your favorite pink/peach lipstick (not the liquid matte kind though!) on your finger, and swiping it back and forth on your eyelid. Use your finger to buff the color into the brow bone. Try swatching on the back of your hand first to test its stain potential.”

Now that you’ve found the right hue, make sure to wear it in a modern way. “This trend looks best when paired with minimal makeup and a lush lash,” she said. “Complete your look by wearing a similar pink hue on your cheeks and lips. This is just the right amount of color-coordinating without appearing too matchy-matchy.” Also: She suggests using a fluffy brush to dust a little shadow on your brow bone to give warmth to the look.

There is one place pink shadow should not go. “To avoid possibly looking sickly, focus on the upper eyelid only and steer clear of the lower waterline,” she explained. “Applying on the lower lash line can make your eyelids look irritated.”

Article by: 

CONTEMPORARY WATERCOLOR HAIR!

Here at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Academy in San Jose, we love us some watercolor tresses. You can find ladies of all ages rocking this trend! We came a across this fab article on Popsugar.com showcasing PRAVANA Artistic Color Director Vadre Grigsby, creating her version of the look. Check out the article below to learn more.

By now the image of a woman with rainbow, unicorn-like hair seems commonplace. The look has been trending on Instagram for a few years, but that doesn’t mean we are over it. And sometimes the classics — like watercolor-inspired locks — are still our favorites.

This video of Pravana Artistic Color Director Vader Grigsby creating the look on a blonde woman reminded us how pretty watercolor hair is. In the video, the technique was also explained in case you want to try it or tell your colorist how to do it.

Rainbow hues were applied horizontally to sections in random areas. Shades are layered in an artistic way. “This look is created visually and relies on subtle saturation of colors in varying shades,” the video caption states. The colorist continues to take sections and repeat this technique so the watercolors layer over each other.

Watch it to see this mesmerizing and gorgeous mermaid transformation!