Makeup News: Too Faced Is Going Global!

 

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The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond school is excited to learn that the makeup brand Too Faced Cosmetics is going Global. The brand was recently acquired by Estee Lauder family, and with joining the family means global domination and a larger product line to come!

 

 

Too Faced is growing up! The brand started by Jarrod Blandino has just be acquired by the Estée Lauder family. The acquisition of the company cost a cool $1.45 billion, according to WWD, which happens to be the largest purchase for Estée Lauder.

“The acquisition of Too Faced is complementary to our portfolio of brands because it has a unique feminine and Millennial communication focus, which is really complementary with very little cannibalization with the rest of our makeup portfolio,” president and CEO Fabrizio Freda of Estée Lauder told WWD.

Too Faced, which launched in 1998, has since become the number one seller at Sephora with its Better Than Sex mascara line. Cofounder Blandino says he believes the new partnership with Estée Lauder will allow Too Faced to spread its products across the globe while maintaining its core values.

“We are going to take a more global approach to the business going forward. When you look at what Estée Lauder has been able to do with MAC [Cosmetics] and Jo Malone and different brands that have their own retail outlets, it’s just been phenomenal and we’re really excited about that opportunity and the potential behind that.”

Blandino assured loyal costumers that Too Faced will remain cruelty-free. “We will not be animal testing, we will not be going into China, we will not be made to fold into a corporate culture that we do not have,” Blandino noted. “They love and respect what we have created and are just going to support us and lift us up, without changing us in any way but great,” he added.

With the new deal set in place, Too Faced cofounders are looking forward to an exciting future working with Estée Lauder and producing top-notch content for consumers, including a skin care and fragrance line.

“We are going to continue to dominate the color category, spinning skin care ingredients into the color cosmetics arena,” Blandino revealed regarding the future of Too Faced. “There are so many different places that we can go now because we have the support and resources. We have just been trying to keep up with the momentum of the shooting star that we created in 1998.” Sounds like a win-win situation to us.

 

Makeup News: Roll Me In Fairydust & Call Me A Unicorn!

 

 

 

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When Unicorn Lashes originally came out with unicorn-inspired makeup brushes earlier this year, beauty junkies everywhere collectively shed glittery tears of joy. And now, the magical tools will soon come in your favorite metallic finish — rose gold.

It comes as no surprise that two huge beauty trends are joining forces in the most magical way. Unicorns have been at the forefront of beauty trends this year inspiring everything from tattoos torainbow highlighters, while women have been flocking to their salons to try the rose gold hair color trend.

Unicorn Lashes’ original set of vegan Unicorn Brushes sold out twice this September in just 12 hours, so expect the rose gold set (available in 2017) to be hard to get your hands on.

The photos released of the new set feature bristles with deep red tips to match the rosy shade of the handles. It’s important to note that this might not be the final design of the rose gold collection. Mel Blue, the founder of Unicorn Lashes, revealed in an interview with Allure that she’s considering other designs including a combination of gray and pink bristles. If you can’t wait until 2017 to get some unicorn brushes, Unicorn Lashes will restock the original rainbow-bristled set in December.

It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

Station Special FX Makeup

Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist

PRODUCT ALERT : SPICE UP YOUR WORLD – JUST A LITTLE MAKE UP… We Love Make Up!

Posh Spice is teaming up with world makeup leader Estée Lauder.

Estee Lauder and Victoria Beckham have teamed up this fall to give us an exclusive 14 piece collection inspired by four very stylish cities. London, Los Angeles, New York City and Paris. Victoria says “Expect L.A. to be “strong, youthful, and fresh” and London to be “a bit edgy, a little bit rock-’n’-roll,” Expect this collection to sell out fast!

The Salon Professional Academy (a beauty school in San jose, Ca)  offers Basic to Advanced Make Up courses within the Esthetics and Cosmetology programs.