The 4 Most Inspiring Books To Read in Cosmetology School!

The Educators at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond Academy in San Jose, love to inspire out students. We are always on the hunt for new techniques, looks and of course books! We asked our educators to list some of their favorite reads that have inspired them to grow as artists, and to create a career and life they love as hairstylists. Check out their top 4 books, some by the top salons owners in the country.

41umlraxpuLIt’s Not Really About the Hair

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Who Moved My Cheese

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Hair By Sam Mcknight

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Making Faces by Kevyn Aucoin

Are you ready to change your life and start working in a fun and stylish career as a cosmetologist?

Be sure to email as or give us a ring at (408) 579-9111 to set up your TSPA tour!

Makeup News: Prep+Prime Essential Oils

 

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology and skincare school based in San Jose, is super excited about M.A.C Cosmetics new product launch of their Prep and Prime Oils. Check out the article below to learn more!

Just when you thought M.A.C. was done dropping its holiday offerings, the cult-favorite cosmetics brand goes and reveals a collection so cool it’s worthy of your immediate attention: the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils line.

The cosmetics-first brand is digging deeper into the skin-care realm with its latest line, the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils collection. How, you might ask? With a set of soothing plant-derived essentials oils formulated specifically for post-cleanse application—as a primer, if you will—before the rest of your skin-care routine. In case you’re just casually reading this post and not picking up what we’re putting down, it’s pretty big news. M.A.C. has managed to create an oil that isn’t slick or makeup repellant. Instead, it quenches the skin as it clings onto whatever you layer on top. That’s big news here in the beauty-sphere. Happily, the claims stack-up. A few drops under makeup result in nothing short of a healthy glow (and makeup that doesn’t budge).

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These botanical-infused oils come in three different scents for every nose-proclivity: There’s the zippy Grapefruit & Chamomile, the calming Sweet Orange & Lavender, and the energizing Yuzu, and each retails for $27. And in case you didn’t notice from the photo above, the M.A.C. Prep and Prime Oils collection also includes a Prep+Prime Essential Oils Stick, which offers the same soothing and hydrating benefits as the oils but in a solid stick form that’s great for under-eye touchups and hitting those hard-to-reach crevices, like around the nose. We should also mention, if you’re always on the go, this tiny tube might just be your new go-to, as after a few swipes of application, you can quickly pop it back into your bag before heading out the door. Can’t wait to get your hands on the line? Us either. Too bad you’ll have to wait until December 26. Post-presents shopping spree, anyone?

 

Article by SARAH KINONEN

Makeup News: Beauty on Demand!

The teachers and students at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, love to Netflix and chill on your days away from the salon.Who does not love Netflix! It’s cheap, fun and even comes to you via mail or is currently living in valuable app space on your phone. Well a new beauty company call Beauty Pie is about the launch the new equivalent of Netflix, but it is all about makeup!!! Check out the article by

 

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Marcia Kilgore is well-versed in launching revolutionary companies, but her newest venture may just change the beauty world forever.

The entrepreneur founded a string of household name brands — Bliss, FitFlop, Soap & Glory — before moving on to Beauty Pie, a new subscription service that calls itself “makeup without the markup.”

The concept is simple, but genius: Kilgore works with the chemists and manufacturers behind prestige companies and has them create formulas for Beauty Pie. If you sign up for a $10/monthly (or $120/annually) subscription, you’ll get access to these beauty products at factory price. For example, a Beauty Pie volumizing mascara would cost you $24 if you bought it without subscribing, but if you are a member, you’ll only pay $2(!).

This concept was born out of her own work with beauty suppliers, which she missed after selling her last company. “I would get to leave with a huge bag of products to test, which was thrilling,” Kilgore told POPSUGAR via email. “I would then stumble into a cosmetics shop in the airport or train station on my way home, and think, ‘Whoa, I am glad I don’t have to pay retail for my cosmetics!’ There was this idea to make that thrilling ‘kid in a candy store’ feeling available to every woman.”

Kilgore hopes that Beauty Pie will appeal to the beauty junkie who has a love of the deluxe, but is trying to cut back on how much they spend. She looked at brands like Everlane, Spotify, and Netflix for inspiration, which all offer transparent pricing and convenience.

Beauty Pie’s transparent pricing comes from the lack of markup that goes into each product. Think about your favorite designer makeup brand: the sheer prestige behind the label is mostly to blame for the expensive cost. Meanwhile, the manufacturers behind that pricey item likely also produce drugstore makeup.

“Most brands do not have their own factories, but rather source their products from outside factories,” Kilgore explained. “For example, Tesco sources from the same makeup factory as Charlotte Tilbury.”

Another expensive characteristic of high-end cosmetics is the fancy packaging. “In a lot of cases, the packaging costs more than the product, and it isn’t recyclable and it ends up in landfills,” said Kilgore. Not so with Beauty Pie. The brand is taking luxury formulas from the best factories around the world and then packaging them in minimalist but chic tubes.

“We are trying to minimize the impact of our use and love of cosmetics on landfills,” said Kilgore. Her team hopes to work toward developing cosmetics packaging that is more recyclable as well as aesthetically pleasing (a rare feat in today’s product development landscape).

Beauty Pie just launched in December 2016, but the brand will be rolling out tools in January, then moving on to skin care in April. Kilgore is starting with “incredible Swiss formulations” for this category and has tapped labs in South Korea, Japan, France, and more clear complexion hubs around the world for future launches.

“We are literally launching 365 new makeup products next year alone,” revealed Kilgore, “So there’s going to be a lot for her to choose from . . . a cornucopia of cosmetics.”

Considering “cut back on beauty spending” is a common New Year’s resolution for many makeup junkies, it’s definitely worth seeing what a Beauty Pie membership can do you for your wallet. Learn more when you visit beautypie.com.

Makeup News: Sweet Peach Time!

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Dedicated Too Faced fans know that a mouthwatering makeup launch has been in the works since July, which is when brand cofounder Jerrod Blandino first teased the packaging of the Sweet Peach Glow Highlighting Palette. The original Too Faced Sweet Peach product — a fruity-fragranced eye shadow palette — caused chaos when it debuted back in March, so it was only logical that the brand would want to expand its juicy empire and produce more peach goods. Fans have been clamoring for the full collection’s reveal, and at long last, we’re seeing it all.

Because of Jerrod’s generosity with his Instagram followers, we already knew that the range contained the aforementioned highlighting palette, a blush, the existing eye shadow palette, and lip glosses. We now know there are eight different gloss shades in an all-new formula for Too Faced: Creamy Peach Oil Lip Gloss. The edited assortment is part of Too Faced’s Spring collection, but don’t let that stop you from wearing them all throughout Winter. They’ll add a burst of color, delectable fragrance, and (thanks to the adorable peach cartoons!) a dose of sweetness to a dreary day.

If you’re already amped to grab it all, know that the collection officially launches on Dec. 15, but it seems that Jerrod has implied that his Instagram followers will get early shopping access. So read on to see and swoon over it all, then stay vigilant!

 

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Makeup News: Color Correction form the 1950″s

 

 

 

 

 

At The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, skincare and makeup school in San Jose, California we love anything vintage. We especially love learning about the makeup culture of the late 50’s. Check out this article and video we came across on Popsuagr.com

I’ve always had a deep interest in vintage beauty products. It’s partially the fact that I’m a beauty editor, but it’s likely also due to the charm and mystique surrounding retro Hollywood icons. (After all, who is Marilyn Monroe without her signature red lip?) Formulas like cake mascara and cream blush have long, fabled histories, and now, thanks to the glory that is YouTube, I know all about how pressed powder was made back in the 1950s.

The video above demonstrates how employees of Charles of the Ritz — a now-discontinued brand that was once owned by Revlon — mixed up various pigments to create a custom powder shade for their clients. You’ll definitely learn something from the brief clip, but I advise that you ignore the heartily sexist narration as you watch (“From tram lines to lines women at least are more concerned about, the lines on their faces . . . ” Really, dude?).

As the brand representative mixes shades of green, crimson, and lilac to create a soft beige, it’s clear that she has an excellent eye for color . . . and that color correcting is a technique that has been utilized for decades. After all, blending those hues not only results in a flattering skin-tone tint but also works to even out the wearer’s complexion. (Green cancels out redness, lilac negates sallow skin, and red adds life into a dull face.)

 If you’re dying to get your hands on a bespoke pressed powder of your own after viewing the above video, know that Three Custom Color, a brand known for whipping up custom cosmetics, can do this for you. Or you can actually snag one of Charles of the Ritz’s Loose Powders ($5) online.

Makeup News: Roll Me In Fairydust & Call Me A Unicorn!

 

 

 

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When Unicorn Lashes originally came out with unicorn-inspired makeup brushes earlier this year, beauty junkies everywhere collectively shed glittery tears of joy. And now, the magical tools will soon come in your favorite metallic finish — rose gold.

It comes as no surprise that two huge beauty trends are joining forces in the most magical way. Unicorns have been at the forefront of beauty trends this year inspiring everything from tattoos torainbow highlighters, while women have been flocking to their salons to try the rose gold hair color trend.

Unicorn Lashes’ original set of vegan Unicorn Brushes sold out twice this September in just 12 hours, so expect the rose gold set (available in 2017) to be hard to get your hands on.

The photos released of the new set feature bristles with deep red tips to match the rosy shade of the handles. It’s important to note that this might not be the final design of the rose gold collection. Mel Blue, the founder of Unicorn Lashes, revealed in an interview with Allure that she’s considering other designs including a combination of gray and pink bristles. If you can’t wait until 2017 to get some unicorn brushes, Unicorn Lashes will restock the original rainbow-bristled set in December.

It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

Station Special FX Makeup

Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist