Makeup News: The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color

 

 

enhanced-9396-1454721021-2

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is a lover of Instagram makeup style. Who doesn’t love, those bold brows,  pouty lips and fleek eye shadow looks. We came across a new trend all over our favorite beauty instagramers, and it is all about The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color. Check out the article below by: 

 

 

pink-eye-shadow-ideas

Scroll through your Instagram feed (if you follow a lot of beauty bloggers!), and one thing should be apparent: pink eye is rampant! The Barbie-inspired eye color may seem unexpected for Fall (when dark colors usually reign supreme), but it’s definitely a spreading movement. Think of it as a nod to October sunsets, Autumn leaves, and the flush you get from being in the cold air too long. We love it for holiday party makeup, a wedding look, or workwear.

“A playful and pretty pop of pink shadow can work to instantly brighten your look,” Kelli J. Bartlett, Director of Makeup Artistry at Glamsquad, told POPSUGAR. “This trend has a youthful and energetic quality that can look dreamy or dramatic, depending on the shade and application you choose.”

So let’s talk about how to find the right pink so you look sick not sickly. In general, Bartlett believes all skin tones can rock a pink shadow, and the best way to find yours is trial and error. “When finding the right type of pink (cool or warm), you should consider your overall coloring (hair color, complexion, and eye color) as this will inform the type of pink that complements you best,” she said. “Rich raspberries look amazing on deeper tones, while light blush can look gorgeous on fair skin.”

She also has a hack if you’re not ready to buy a pink palette, but still looking to experiment. “For those who aren’t ready for hot pinky pink, pop your favorite blush color on your eye,” she advised. “You can also test the trend by dabbing some of your favorite pink/peach lipstick (not the liquid matte kind though!) on your finger, and swiping it back and forth on your eyelid. Use your finger to buff the color into the brow bone. Try swatching on the back of your hand first to test its stain potential.”

Now that you’ve found the right hue, make sure to wear it in a modern way. “This trend looks best when paired with minimal makeup and a lush lash,” she said. “Complete your look by wearing a similar pink hue on your cheeks and lips. This is just the right amount of color-coordinating without appearing too matchy-matchy.” Also: She suggests using a fluffy brush to dust a little shadow on your brow bone to give warmth to the look.

There is one place pink shadow should not go. “To avoid possibly looking sickly, focus on the upper eyelid only and steer clear of the lower waterline,” she explained. “Applying on the lower lash line can make your eyelids look irritated.”

Article by: 

CONTEMPORARY WATERCOLOR HAIR!

Here at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Academy in San Jose, we love us some watercolor tresses. You can find ladies of all ages rocking this trend! We came a across this fab article on Popsugar.com showcasing PRAVANA Artistic Color Director Vadre Grigsby, creating her version of the look. Check out the article below to learn more.

By now the image of a woman with rainbow, unicorn-like hair seems commonplace. The look has been trending on Instagram for a few years, but that doesn’t mean we are over it. And sometimes the classics — like watercolor-inspired locks — are still our favorites.

This video of Pravana Artistic Color Director Vader Grigsby creating the look on a blonde woman reminded us how pretty watercolor hair is. In the video, the technique was also explained in case you want to try it or tell your colorist how to do it.

Rainbow hues were applied horizontally to sections in random areas. Shades are layered in an artistic way. “This look is created visually and relies on subtle saturation of colors in varying shades,” the video caption states. The colorist continues to take sections and repeat this technique so the watercolors layer over each other.

Watch it to see this mesmerizing and gorgeous mermaid transformation!

It’s all about the rainbow braids!

 

Check out this article by Amina Mucciolo. Amina is known for her tassel business, but she is also taking the world by storm with her stylish rainbow yarn braids. Read on the learn more and checkout the video to learn her techquie for rainbow yarn braids!

She styles them herself with yarn she buys from the craft store. To finish her entire head takes upward of 30 hours. But as she tells us, color is such a motivating factor in her life that it’s “absolutely” worth it.

The designer, stylist, and YouTuber, 33, has long been obsessed with bold, splashy hues. In 2011, she started her own paper decor company, Studio Mucci, thus earning her the nickname “The Tassel Fairy.” When she’s not spreading magic through her crafts, she uses her YouTube channel to inspire other women to be confident and, of course, “to live colorfully.”

It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

Station Special FX Makeup

Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist

Braids are no longer for school girls!

The Salon Professional Academy, the leading edge beauty school, in San Jose is on top of fall trends. Braids!

New York Fashion Week just started and already all different types of braids can be seen all over the runways. Boxer braids, boho braids and even modern french braids. Thanks to the movie Frozen and Games of Thrones, braids are the must have hair style for fall 2016. Braids are no longer for school girls! See some of the stylish ways to wear braids this fall.

spring_summer_2016_hairstyle_trends_braids_on_the_back1 Rachel-Zoe-Fall-2016 Creatures-Comfort-Fall-2016

 

Want to become a master hair braider? The Salon Professional Academy will teach you how to dutch, fishtail and rope intricate khaleesi worthy braids in our cosmetology program, and you can always stop by and have your braids did before your night out!