Create A Business And Life You Love! Become A Cosmetologist @ TSPA

TSPA San Jose Tour

Are you thinking about becoming a licensed cosmetologist with the help of The San professional Academy in San Jose? Once you complete your cosmetology hours at The Salon Professionally Academy, and pass your stare board test, you can choose to be a makeup artist to a socialite. The next Kate Sommerville with a global skincare line, or be backstage at a fashion show creating ad campaign worthy hairstyles. The Salon Professional Academy is the number one cosmetology and skincare school in San Jose and Bay Area, and we want you to create a business and life you love! Check out the article below by Marie Huntington of Chron.com

Makeup Artists

Makeup artists work with colors to apply makeup products to their clients, including lip glosses, eye shadows and facial foundations. Some makeup artists are qualified to provide skin care treatments to their clients using facial cleansers, moisturizers and oils. They also provide consultations regarding the application of makeup and recommend products and makeup colors to clients.

Hair Stylists

The hair stylist occupation may be the most well-known career in cosmetology. Hair stylists help their clients maintain the vitality of their hair. They are skilled at creating hairstyles for clients and ensuring the upkeep of hairstyles for ongoing clientele. Some hair stylists provide consultations in hair colors, hairstyles and hair care. Barbers are also licensed cosmetologists, but their duties consist of offering haircuts and facial trims. However, many barbers are qualified to perform other hair care practices similar to hair stylists, such as shampooing and coloring hair.

Nail Technicians

Nail technicians perform treatments of the hands, nails and feet. These treatments generally include various types of manicures, pedicures, aromatherapy treatments and massages of the hands and feet. In addition to providing care and maintenance to the hands, nails and feet, nail technicians also apply synthetic nails and polishing agents for their clients.

Estheticians

Estheticians perform skin care treatments, massages and hair removal treatment. Estheticians are licensed cosmetologists, and their procedures entail using cleansing agents, lotions, body oils and other skin care products to help beautify and maintain the skin care of their clients. Estheticians also provide consultations and recommend treatments to their clients. However, estheticians are not qualified to diagnose and treat skin disorders and other skin-related ailments.

Tip

Most cosmetology programs take one to two years to complete, and aspiring licensed cosmetologists are typically required to choose a cosmetology specialty as their career focus. Because of the continuous changes in fashion trends, cosmetologists must continue to upgrade their skills to meet the demands of diverse clientele. To become successful in the cosmetology occupation, individuals must possess interpersonal communication skills to attract and retain ongoing clients.

Makeup News: The World Has Gone Baddie!

 

Here at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a cosmetology and skincare school. We love Urban Decay and the Instagram sensation Baddie Winkle, and now the two have combine! Baddie is now this months beauty muse for the brand. Just out the awesome article below, and take a sneak peek at whats to come from the collaboration!

BY ALEXANDRA ENGLER

You might know 88-year-old Baddie Winkle best from Instagram. There, you can see the badass grandma hanging out with Khloé Kardashian, staring in a Fergie music video, donning a pink feathered robe to the Grammys red carpet, or rocking a bedazzled nude bodysuit to the MTV Video Music Awards. Basically, she is living her best life. And who am I kidding? She’s living my best life, too.

Well, Winkle just got even cooler: Urban Decay named her its latest Monthly Muse. It’s a pairing that makes total sense; Urban Decay is all about having fun with your look, making your own rules, and living colorfully. And you can find few who do that better than this social media star who currently has 2.6 million Instagram followers and a bio that says “Stealing your man since 1928.”

For the Muse shoot, Urban Decay flew the Tennessee-native to Los Angeles and dressed her up various cool-girl ensembles, including a see-through fishnet top, sequin silver dress, pink bomber, and a star-stitched jean skirt. It looked like what I imagine would happen if Rizzo from Grease decided to become a street style blogger.

But the sartorial choices are all par for the course for Winkle, she tells Urban Decay in an accompanying Q&A video. “I’ve always been stylish, and I love color,” she says. “Color for clothes inspires me.” For her makeup, Winkle says she uses eyeshadow, lipstick, and Urban Decay’s Setting Sprays.

Winkle fits right into the Muse series, where the brand featured twin-sisters Corianna and Brianna Dotson, founders of Coco and Breezy eyewear, lifestyle blogger Hieu Cow, and model-photographer-DJ Alie Layus. They’re all cool AF women who are defining beauty on their own terms, while being total bosses.

Makeup News: Do You Wash Your Makeup Brushes ENOUGH?

 

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We’re true makeup fanatics, but there’s one part of our routine that we actively detest — washing our brushes. We know we have to, but not only does it take up a lot of our time (which we could be using for Netflix binge-watching!), it could actually damage our favorite tools if we do it wrong. We reached out to Jenny Patinkin, celebrity makeup artist and founder of luxury brush line Lazy Perfection to get her top tips on brush care, cleansing, and more.

If you’re more of a skimmer, let this be the one fact you learn: do not share your brushes with anyone else. “Coming in contact with your own oils and germs is one thing, but being exposed to someone else’s bacteria is entirely another,” Jenny warned. Once you know the danger of a dirty brush, you’ll want to clean your tools daily! Here’s how to get the job done.

 

Your Brush-Cleaning Options

You have two options when cleaning your brushes: a quick-dry method or a more thorough wet wash. But before you start, take your tools into consideration. According to Jenny, just like different hair textures have different needs, so do brushes. Fine-haired ones need to be treated with the utmost care as they’re cleaned to avoid breakage, while coarse-bristled tools need to be conditioned so they don’t get rough. And take some extra time washing your synthetic styles, especially if you use them for applying cream products like foundation. “Because they aren’t porous and don’t absorb any oils, you have to be careful not to let them get coated and weighed down,” explained Jenny.

When you’re actually washing your tool, let its shape guide you. “Domed or round brushes can be swirled, while flatter shapes should be dragged from side to side,” Jenny advised. “If you work against the shape of the brush, you can end up distorting the hair pattern or damaging the hairs.” While you might think that isn’t such a big deal, trust us — mussed or broken bristles means a messy application. And, when you’re creating highly precise looks like a cat eye, you don’t want your tool working against you.

Skin News:Your Skin Doesn’t Have to Peel With a Peel.

While earlier versions of acid-based exfoliating treatments could make skin visibly slough away, the latest formulas leave skin glowing, not flaking. Many include several alpha and beta hydroxy acids, rather than just one at a higher concentration. “When you combine acids at lower strengths, they’re potentially less irritating,” says New York City dermatologist Dennis Gross. And you don’t have to see peeling to see results. “As the acid dissolves the cement between skin cells, you may have thousands of them coming off at the same time—but the shedding is still invisible to the naked eye,” says Neal Schultz, a clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

An acid product is only as potent as the free-acid compounds floating around inside it. Too many acid bits and your skin stings and gets red; too few and nothing happens (we mean nada—no exfoliation, no glow). So chemists play with the pH, which adjusts the amount of free acids. The ideal pH is between 3 and 4, but it’s almost never listed on packaging. So how do you pick a winner? Some experts say your skin should tingle for a few seconds when you apply the product. “If the acid is penetrating, you’re going to feel something,” says Eric ­Bernstein, a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. And expect some instant gratification. “An effective product should leave your skin looking immediately refreshed,” says Gross. (Discover our six favorites.)

“Acids don’t work like retinoids, which repair skin by kick-starting inflammation,” says Ranella Hirsch, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine. “They dissolve the upper layer of cells to trigger repair.” Plus, unlike with scrubs, the skin is not damaged by abrasives. So if you’re sensitive, acids are actually a wise choice. Look for formulas that combine them with an amino acid, like arginine, which slows their penetration into skin. (We like Philosophy Hope in a Jar Night.) And don’t rush in. “Irritation can take a while to show up,” says Hirsch. “You may get to day four, then all of a sudden your skin reacts.” Take a month to ramp up to daily use.

Magnanimous girlfriends and pug owners insist that size doesn’t matter, but cosmetic chemists disagree. The smaller a molecule, the more easily it gets into the skin. Because glycolic is the smallest of all the acids, it yields the most dramatic results. “There’s a reason glycolic is the acid used the most in anti-aging products and doctor’s-office peels,” says Hirsch. “It does the job.” Almost as well as a prescription retinoid, says Schultz. (Try Avon Anew Clinical Advanced Retexturizing Peel.) Some dermatologists believe that no one talks about how glycolic acid changes the structure of the skin because then the FDA will call it a drug, regulate it, and suddenly we’ll need to see a doctor to get it. But the truth is that it regenerates collagen, thickens the epidermis and dermis, and evens skin tone. (Shhhh.)

Now for the reality check: Over-the-counter acid products—even most doctor’s-office peels—cannot smooth deep lines. “Only fillers and laser procedures can do that,” says Wilma Bergfeld, a senior dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “These compounds can minimize fine lines and fade blotches, but they have limitations.” According to Hirsch, your skin gets the most from acids in your 20s and 30s: “After that, I have patients treat serious damage with a prescription retinoid and refresh their skin with regular peels at home or in my office.”

To treat a blotchy chest, extend your AHA face cream a few inches south. Clear up bacne (or, worse, buttne) with a salicylic acid body wash: Apply it to dry skin, wait 15 minutes, then get in the shower and rinse. When the backs of your arms feel like a plucked goose, don’t try to scrub the bumps away—they’ll just get inflamed. Instead, apply a lotion with AHAs or BHAs to unclog the pores and dissolve the dry skin.

Makeup News: Too Faced Is Going Global!

 

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The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond school is excited to learn that the makeup brand Too Faced Cosmetics is going Global. The brand was recently acquired by Estee Lauder family, and with joining the family means global domination and a larger product line to come!

 

 

Too Faced is growing up! The brand started by Jarrod Blandino has just be acquired by the Estée Lauder family. The acquisition of the company cost a cool $1.45 billion, according to WWD, which happens to be the largest purchase for Estée Lauder.

“The acquisition of Too Faced is complementary to our portfolio of brands because it has a unique feminine and Millennial communication focus, which is really complementary with very little cannibalization with the rest of our makeup portfolio,” president and CEO Fabrizio Freda of Estée Lauder told WWD.

Too Faced, which launched in 1998, has since become the number one seller at Sephora with its Better Than Sex mascara line. Cofounder Blandino says he believes the new partnership with Estée Lauder will allow Too Faced to spread its products across the globe while maintaining its core values.

“We are going to take a more global approach to the business going forward. When you look at what Estée Lauder has been able to do with MAC [Cosmetics] and Jo Malone and different brands that have their own retail outlets, it’s just been phenomenal and we’re really excited about that opportunity and the potential behind that.”

Blandino assured loyal costumers that Too Faced will remain cruelty-free. “We will not be animal testing, we will not be going into China, we will not be made to fold into a corporate culture that we do not have,” Blandino noted. “They love and respect what we have created and are just going to support us and lift us up, without changing us in any way but great,” he added.

With the new deal set in place, Too Faced cofounders are looking forward to an exciting future working with Estée Lauder and producing top-notch content for consumers, including a skin care and fragrance line.

“We are going to continue to dominate the color category, spinning skin care ingredients into the color cosmetics arena,” Blandino revealed regarding the future of Too Faced. “There are so many different places that we can go now because we have the support and resources. We have just been trying to keep up with the momentum of the shooting star that we created in 1998.” Sounds like a win-win situation to us.

 

Makeup News: Roll Me In Fairydust & Call Me A Unicorn!

 

 

 

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When Unicorn Lashes originally came out with unicorn-inspired makeup brushes earlier this year, beauty junkies everywhere collectively shed glittery tears of joy. And now, the magical tools will soon come in your favorite metallic finish — rose gold.

It comes as no surprise that two huge beauty trends are joining forces in the most magical way. Unicorns have been at the forefront of beauty trends this year inspiring everything from tattoos torainbow highlighters, while women have been flocking to their salons to try the rose gold hair color trend.

Unicorn Lashes’ original set of vegan Unicorn Brushes sold out twice this September in just 12 hours, so expect the rose gold set (available in 2017) to be hard to get your hands on.

The photos released of the new set feature bristles with deep red tips to match the rosy shade of the handles. It’s important to note that this might not be the final design of the rose gold collection. Mel Blue, the founder of Unicorn Lashes, revealed in an interview with Allure that she’s considering other designs including a combination of gray and pink bristles. If you can’t wait until 2017 to get some unicorn brushes, Unicorn Lashes will restock the original rainbow-bristled set in December.

Makeup News: Top 3 foundations for the season!

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is always on the lookout for the best foundations on the market, and we found them. Checkout the article by  for popsugar.com

If you want to improve your makeup game, the key is to start with a good foundation. For many, that’s easier said than done. Shade matching and finding that unicorn formula — the one that looks like a better version of your skin instead of a cakey mask — can seem impossible. To help make the search for Mr. Right Foundation easier, we took these challenges to the pros in hopes of separating the flaky from the flawless. Read on for some of the ones they and their celebrity clients have come to love.

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Laura Mercier Oil-Free Tinted Moisturizer

“I love this product! Its creamy consistency allows for easy application and blending, and it offers sheer coverage with oil control and a semimatte finish. Plus, there’s great color selection for a wide range of skin tones.” — Francesca Roman

 

 

 

 

 

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Hourglass Vanish Seamless Finish Foundation Stick

“The stick application makes this perfect for when you’re on the go. Not only is it mess-free, but the formula offers full coverage (essentially like a concealer), goes on silky, and buffs into the skin like butter! The line’s color range is also amazing — it has you covered on every end of the spectrum!” — Alison Christian

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MAC Face and Body Foundation

“This supersheer foundation, which has become a cult favorite, has a watery texture that can offer the lightest of coverage. It also dries down and can be built up if you’d like more. It mimics the skin’s texture, offering the perfect veil of pigment. It’s best applied with a flat nylon brush (like MAC’s #191) and is good for all skin types.” — Ashleigh Ciucci

Makeup News: CMA Awards

 

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is a lover of all music. We especial love those chic ladies of country music, and lucky for us, they where out in full force for the CMA Awards. Check out the article below by  for Popsugar.com

It’s about to get messy!

Tonight is the night, at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose we are welcoming awarding SFX Artist Elizabeth Fox. Elizabeth will be teaching our students about the history of SFX makeup artistry, and creating some nasty wounds and zombies. So while we wait for her arrival, we came across this recent article about her work by  for Metiza.com. Check it out, and we will see all our TSPA students tonight.
Halloween isn’t the only time of year for mad zombie makeup skills.

Elizabeth Fox has been a working  Special FX Makeup Artist for fifteen years. Since 2001, she has studio credit on over 25 feature films, primarily horror and indie. When she’s not throwing fake blood around on set, she’s making people beautiful for commercials, television and for their big day down the aisle. This doesn’t begin to count the hours of work, hundreds of trial-runs and years of training Elizabeth has been involved in to establish her reputation in the field.

This time of the year especially, many people are interested in Special FX makeup, perhaps to match with a certain costume or party theme, but to her it’s a way of life. Elizabeth is here to share the behind-the -scenes reality of this artistic passion.

Elizabeth, you have a crazy cool job as an FX makeup artist. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

EF: I am from Northern California and recently moved back into the house I grew up in in the Bay Area after having lived in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. I loved living in all three cities and love the different makeup work in each place. I have a super amazing kid I named Ramona for three reasons: the children books by Beverly Cleary, a song my grandfather used to sing to my grandmother, and my deep love for the band the Ramones.

I consider myself a Special FX Makeup Artist, although now that I’m back in the Bay Area, I primarily do commercial, beauty, and bridal makeup as well as teach. Every few months I’ll take on an FX job that may not pay the bills the way commercial work does, but it feeds my soul.

Is this career something you always dreamed of doing, or did you happen upon it later on? What was the path of training/education?

EF: I never thought I’d be a makeup artist: It seemed to go against everything I believed in as a young feminist. I didn’t read fashion magazines; I didn’t give in to society’s beliefs that women need to adorn themselves; I don’t support companies that prey on insecurities while objectifying their customers. I like wearing makeup, but I don’t need makeup. I completely misunderstood the industry and what makeup has the power to do.

I always assumed I’d be an actress, doing serious and powerful work. I choose makeup artistry after having graduated from college with a theater degree and running a barely surviving theater company for ten years. I found myself loving the ways makeup could transform someone and create character. I thought it would be a good way to continue to work collaboratively, to be creative, and still be surrounded by creative people. Because I understood what actors go through, I felt I could be a good partner in their character building.

Station Special FX Makeup

Are there any misconceptions about your work that you hear from other people? Set the record straight.

The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

EF: There are many misconceptions about the beauty industry. I think being a makeup or hair artist or someone “in the industry” has been thought of as an easy path that doesn’t require a strong skill set and is often viewed as a backup plan for people who aren’t succeeding in traditional workplaces. That saddens me because it couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a huge amount of hard work and drive to be successful.

We are artists, confidantes, therapists, bookkeepers, schedulers. We have to be social-media savvy, networkers, and marketing and financial managers. And being a freelance makeup artist (rather than working for a cosmetics line, for example) requires courage and strength of character. The successful, working MUAs I know are some of the smartest, intuitive, and kind people I know.

What is the hardest part of the job, and what is the most enjoyable part of it?

EF: The hardest part of the job is translating what people want into what is actually possible, whether it’s a director trying to explain how they want blood to splatter on a wall, or a bridesmaid asking for natural makeup. Different things have different meanings to people. Blood splatter is very different for Quentin Tarantino than it is for Jane Campion (full disclosure, I have not worked with either director).

The most enjoyable part of the job is difficult to pin down. I love so many things about what I do. With Beauty makeup, I love helping someone feel beautiful and confident. There is nothing to match what it feels like to watch when someone looks into a mirror and loves what they see. With Special FX makeup, the creation of the monster or wound or what it is you’re doing is amazingly rewarding on so many levels. But watching the character come to life, seeing how an actor is transformed because of what you did-that’s my favorite part.

Alien Special FX Makeup

 Makeup can be such a fun way of expressing yourself, and feeling confident. What or who was your inspiration to do this as a career?

The key to beauty makeup is it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful  by bringing out who you are, not by concealing.

EF: Once I chose makeup artistry, I sought out the innovators and those who pushed the boundaries of both beauty and Special FX Makeup. The people I consider my FX heroes are Dick Smith, Ve Neill, and Tom Savini. Beauty wise, I’m always looking for the subtlety of a creative mind. Alex Box and Roshar are two incredibly talented and creative artists I admire. But I am inspired by genuineness; people and things that are uniquely their own.

Do you have any advice for young women who are interested in makeup, specifically FX as a career?

EF: My advice is to assist as many different makeup artists as you can. Classes and workshops are a great way to meet other artists and learn some basics, but you need to see how different artists work, what their kits are filled with, how they interact on set—it’s all invaluable. Send emails to artists you follow on IG or whose work inspires you and offer your assistance.

Don’t expect to make a lot of money when you first start out. It’s a tough road to get your name out there and you have to be professional and take it and yourself seriously.

Often the message of inner vs. outer beauty ever comes up between artists and clients. Do you find that happening?

EF: The issue of inner beauty versus outer beauty comes up all the time, though not as much with actors and models as when I work with private clients such as female CEOs. I love discussing the role of makeup within the professional world for women. It’s so loaded when you talk about the need for makeup in order to be taken seriously.

I’m lucky in that I get to work with some brilliant women who are interested in the discussion, know who they are and don’t need makeup, but like what it can do. That’s the key to beauty makeup, in my opinion: it’s fun and can make you feel wonderful about yourself by bringing out who you are, not by concealing yourself.

Elizabeth Fox Special FX Makeup Artist