7 Questions To Ask On Your School Tour @ TSPA!

Redken Diamond Academy - TSPA

 

You made the decision to invest in your future. You found the perfect cosmetology school #TSPA. You booked your school tour, now what…….. Here at The Salon Professional Academy (TSPA), we realize starting a new career can be scary when you have a lot of questions.
That’s why Victoria Martin, our fabulous Admissions Advisor, is here to help you with questions like:

1. How do I pay for school?
2. What is the schedule like?
3. What is a Redken Diamond Academy?
4. What will I be learning?
5. What are the teachers and students like?
6. Is this the career for me?
7. What are the job opportunities after I graduate?

 

Victoria Martin gets these questions from potential students all the time. She is not just here to answer them, but also here to help you determine if this is the right career for you!

To schedule a one on one tour with Victoria, and get the above questions answered in less than 30 minutes.  Just Text or Call the word “TOUR” to (408) 784-4463.

A Smashing Career as a Hairstylist!!!!!!

Say it loud, and say it proud! You are starting on the path to becoming a hairstylist with the help of The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. You have made the decision to build a career and life you love, working in one of the fastest growing industries. In 2015 the industry generated $56.2 billion in the United States, and expected to keep growing over the next 10 years. With the glowing out look of this industry, only you can limit yourself.  As a licensed cosmetologist you can work in any of the following careers, and you can even work in more than one. Take a look at the list below, created  by The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, California.

 

So Many Career Paths As a Licensed Cosmetologist! 

Cosmetologist  Hairstylist, Barber, Hair Color Specialist, Perm Specialist, Esthetician, Nail Care Artists, Manicurist, Salon Owner, Salon Manager, Salon Coordinator, Salon Sales Consultant, Manufacturer Sales Representative, Makeup Artist, Director of Education, Distributor’s Sales Representative, Fashion Show Stylist, Photo and Movie Stylist, Platform Artist and Educator, Beauty Magazine Writer, Beauty Magazine Editor, Cosmetology School Owner, Cosmetology Instructor, Beauty Care Marketing, Salon Franchisee, Salon Chain Management, Beauty Care Distributor, Salon Computer Expert, Beauty Care PR Specialist, Research Chemist, Beauty Product Designer, Beauty Business Consultant, Trade Show Director, or Beauty School Owner.

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Beauty Industry Growth Facts

 

With the end of your senior year fast approaching, it is time to start making plans to start you stylish career as a cosmetologist with a FAB education at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose. March 7th, 2017 is our next start date! Classes fill up fast! Be sure to send us an email or give us a ring ( 408-784-4463) to set up your tour. We look forward to seeing you at TSPA!

 

Makeup News: IMATS IS COMING

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The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology school in San Jose is excited for the month of January, it is time for IMATS! Our very own Director of Operations, Mrs. Magdalena and Director of Education, Mrs. V are headed to L.A for IMATS. They are going to be meeting the top makeup artist in the industry, and one of the creme de la creme is Academy Award winning makeup artist Ve Neill. Check out the article below by  by VICTORIA STANELL.

 

 

What would you ask one of the world’s top movie makeup artists? Attendees at this year’s IMATS in Los Angeles had the opportunity to voice their questions to three-time Academy Award-winning makeup artist Ve Neill, who served as department head for this year’s Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.

Neill, whose legendary hands helped transform films such as Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, Mrs. Doubtfire, and the Pirates of the Caribbean, is currently a judge on SyFy’s special effects makeup competition Face Off, and is re-launching her brush line “Ve’s Favourite Brushes” after a two-and-a-half year development phase. Hearing her tips, tricks, and stories up close is one of the biggest beauty fan girl moments we’ve ever experienced. And no territory went uncharted—Ve imparted her no-nonsense advice to fledgling artists on everything from attitude on set, the one foundation she can’t stop using, and the number one mistake young makeup artists make. These are the bits of wisdom we captured.

On drawing the line between pretty and ugly [for “The Hunger Games”]…

“It’s a movie. The directors and producers say ‘no, we don’t want it to be ugly, we want her to be pretty.’ You do the best you can, you make them look the way you believe—if they say it’s too much, then it’s too much. You are the tool of the director, and if the director doesn’t want you to make them look ugly, then by gosh you better not. Yes, she can be cut up but we want her to be pretty. After all, they are selling tickets. With Hunger Games, it’s a fantasy. You have to fight your battles.”

On her current favorite foundation…

“I love Make Up For Ever HD Foundation. I use it on almost everything now. I like it because there’s a lot of pigment, it can thin out, it holds up well, and is easy to repair. I used it exclusively on Hunger Games and The Amazing Spiderman.”

On hiring a makeup PA…

“There’s a lot of gofering on set, stuff that has nothing to do with makeup application. Instead of hiring an actual artist, I will hire a PA. Most shows have a budget that allows me to hire PAs with very minimal pay. The very first intern/PA I ever had in 1998 is now a member of 706 [a local makeup union]. This is another way for you to get in and meet people. I’m not the only one who does it. Every department head in 706 will always hire a makeup PA.”

On the biggest lesson she’s ever learned in her career…

“Never leave town without your makeup assistant. I have gone on location without my people and it’s been horrible. They know how you work.”

On taking jobs…

“This is for you working artists: NEVER TURN DOWN A JOB. I don’t care if they tell you they’ll pay you in gas money. Take the money, put it in your car, and get over there. Because you never know who you’re going to meet. You can go to a job, work for free, kill yourself, and wow—you just met the person that’s going to give you your next job. Or you can sit at home and drink a beer. What would you rather be doing? You need the experience, you need to get out there and practice. You need to get out on a set and see what it’s like to work as a team member. It’s very important to have all that in your basket. Everyone works differently—all productions, producers, and production managers are different. You have to learn how to deal with these people.”

On school vs. real-world experience…

“It’s definitely important to get an education now. Makeup has advanced by leaps and bounds, and there are so many products out there and so many different ways to do things. Plus, there are a lot of good schools now. I’m self taught—when I started there were no schools for me! There was one beauty school called Elegance, and they had a mini course on effects but I went and did it myself. Schools are pricey, but you have to consider what it’s going to give you. Your competition is going to school. Your competition will have all that knowledge; do you want to be without it? I don’t think so. You’ll be introduced to products, how to use them properly, and how to take care of your equipment.”

On what’s currently in her kit…

“I use a lot of La Mer because it’s a big name and actors love it. My favorite skin care is made by Natura Bissé, which is dreadfully expensive but amazing. Embryolisse also makes great stuff. I use a lot of MAC skin care for guys that don’t want to mess around, and wipes from L’Oréal because they take off my eye makeup lickety split. For prosthetics, I’ll always clean the face with Kiehl’s Blue Astringent, then I’ll do applications with adhesives.

On letting actors leave makeup on…

“It’s really important that your actors do not leave the set with their makeup on. They go out to eat, get lazy, then go to sleep with the makeup on. Skin care is a really important part of a makeup artist’s job, because how they come back to you the next day is your fault if they’re covered in pimples or dry patches. I always put a skin care kit together for my makeup artists for every actor to take home. On the set of Hunger Games, I would use a galvanic wand treatment on the kids; in many cases a lot of the young skin really improved from doing those treatments.”

On what you can’t teach in makeup school…

“What most kids are lacking is obviously experience, something you only really get by trial and error. Experience is what teaches us our craft. I think those are the things you can’t really teach people in school. Also, set etiquette is really difficult to learn. I didn’t know what I was doing the first time I showed up on set. Who are these people? What do they do? Learn the roles.”

On burning bridges…

“Always take the high road, guys. Never burn a bridge—you don’t know when you will see that person next. Always be pleasant to everybody, because you might work with that same person someplace else. I make it a habit never to be unpleasant to anybody—you never know whose daughter they are, whose boyfriend they are, or who they’re married to.”

On knowing it all…

“As far as I’m concerned, if you are a makeup artist you damn better know how to do it all, because if you’re going to work on movies there are no ‘categories’ for artists. If you’re in movies you have to do it all. If you’re going to work for me you have to do it all. There are a lot of people who only specialize in special effects or glamour makeup, and that’s all they’ll ever be hired for. But a good, rounded makeup artist should never put themselves in a box.”

On staying honest…

“Don’t lie. Don’t start putting your name on shit you didn’t do—really, you don’t need to. Get your test makeups on your resume or your blog, but don’t take credit for other people’s work because someone will bitch-slap you good. Be honest about your resume, try to keep it to what you’ve actually done. If you were background on something, just write “BG”—there’s nothing wrong in saying you were in the bullpen doing background on a movie. Nobody likes a liar.”

On the one technique that’s hard to master…

“Good ‘dirty’ is hard to do. You’ve got to make it look like its ground in, like it’s been there. Everyone in Hunger Games was dirty, even if didn’t look like they were—but the beauty is in the subtle things. If they weren’t dirtied up they’d look spanking clean and weird. Practice good dirt.”

Makeup News: Unicorns, Makeup and Glitter….. Oh My!

It’s time to celebrate, because the makeup gods have blessed us with another magical beauty trend: unicorn horn eyeliner. It’s no surprise that beauty addicts have found another way to channel their inner one-horned horse with the plethora of unicorn-inspired makeup products hitting the market recently. Any mythical-creature enthusiast has her choice of unicorn horn makeup brushes, ethereal rainbow highlighters, and even glow-in-the-dark rainbow hair. Aspiring unicorns get one step closer to their dreams by drawing on their winged liner to resemble a horn. This beauty trend might not be an everyday look, but is perfect for when you need a little more magic in your life. Read on to see the mystical look and be sure to watch the makeup tutorial so you can try it out for yourself.

Makeup News: Drug Store Makeup Super Stars!

 

The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a cosmetology and esthetics school loves learning new makeup hacks, and we have a great one for you. Check out the article below about this new amazing all in on product by Physicians Formula!

BY CHANTEL MOREL

Last night’s AMAs was full of surprises, including an appearance by Selena Gomez, a toned-down Lady Gaga look, and an unexpected downpour that almost flooded the red carpet. Luckily, when the weather throws an unwanted curve ball, pros like makeup artist Mary Phillips come prepared with a bag full of tips, tricks, and of course, products. To ensure client Chrissy Teigen’s eye shadow didn’t come right off when she stepped outside, Phillips needed an eye-shadow base to lock the pigments in place. What she reached for, however, wasn’t an eye-shadow base—it was a contouring stick.

Moments before Teigen stepped onto the red carpet, Phillips posted a picture on her Instagram of the Physician’s Formula Super BB #InstaReady ContourTrio Stick in Bronze Trio. “I’m very into off-label use btw,” she wrote in the caption. “This Physician’s Formula Contour Stick? No no, that’s my sexy new eye-shadow base, especially in this rain!”

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“It’s funny because I’m not even the biggest fan of bases and primers, but when I started messing around with the Physician’s Formula Contour Stick, the night before, I was really intrigued A) by the color selection, and B) by the texture. It was flat but not matte,and silky but not transparent.” Often eye-shadow bases can rest pretty heavy on the eyes, but after playing around with the contour stick, Phillips found the formula to be comfortable and moisturizing. More importantly, it didn’t crease, which is super important if you want your eye shadow to last, especially on muggy days. After a day of testing it out on herself, Phillips decided it was good enough to be put to the ultimate test—the red-carpet step-and-repeat.

Aside from creating a smooth base to seamlessly blend eye shadows, Phillips discovered this little beauty stick had several other uses as well. “I would even just wear this alone on the eyes too,” she said. “I like that it’s an easily portable product, and you can use it for contour, on your cheeks and eyes, and even on your lips—maybe not the lightest color, but the middle caramel color would work, and the darkest color could easily be pulled off on someone with a deeper skin tone.” The makeup artist also adds that the contour stick does have a light shimmer, but it’s not overwhelming or garish.

Makeup News: Too Faced Is Going Global!

 

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The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond school is excited to learn that the makeup brand Too Faced Cosmetics is going Global. The brand was recently acquired by Estee Lauder family, and with joining the family means global domination and a larger product line to come!

 

 

Too Faced is growing up! The brand started by Jarrod Blandino has just be acquired by the Estée Lauder family. The acquisition of the company cost a cool $1.45 billion, according to WWD, which happens to be the largest purchase for Estée Lauder.

“The acquisition of Too Faced is complementary to our portfolio of brands because it has a unique feminine and Millennial communication focus, which is really complementary with very little cannibalization with the rest of our makeup portfolio,” president and CEO Fabrizio Freda of Estée Lauder told WWD.

Too Faced, which launched in 1998, has since become the number one seller at Sephora with its Better Than Sex mascara line. Cofounder Blandino says he believes the new partnership with Estée Lauder will allow Too Faced to spread its products across the globe while maintaining its core values.

“We are going to take a more global approach to the business going forward. When you look at what Estée Lauder has been able to do with MAC [Cosmetics] and Jo Malone and different brands that have their own retail outlets, it’s just been phenomenal and we’re really excited about that opportunity and the potential behind that.”

Blandino assured loyal costumers that Too Faced will remain cruelty-free. “We will not be animal testing, we will not be going into China, we will not be made to fold into a corporate culture that we do not have,” Blandino noted. “They love and respect what we have created and are just going to support us and lift us up, without changing us in any way but great,” he added.

With the new deal set in place, Too Faced cofounders are looking forward to an exciting future working with Estée Lauder and producing top-notch content for consumers, including a skin care and fragrance line.

“We are going to continue to dominate the color category, spinning skin care ingredients into the color cosmetics arena,” Blandino revealed regarding the future of Too Faced. “There are so many different places that we can go now because we have the support and resources. We have just been trying to keep up with the momentum of the shooting star that we created in 1998.” Sounds like a win-win situation to us.

 

Makeup News: Top 3 foundations for the season!

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is always on the lookout for the best foundations on the market, and we found them. Checkout the article by  for popsugar.com

If you want to improve your makeup game, the key is to start with a good foundation. For many, that’s easier said than done. Shade matching and finding that unicorn formula — the one that looks like a better version of your skin instead of a cakey mask — can seem impossible. To help make the search for Mr. Right Foundation easier, we took these challenges to the pros in hopes of separating the flaky from the flawless. Read on for some of the ones they and their celebrity clients have come to love.

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Laura Mercier Oil-Free Tinted Moisturizer

“I love this product! Its creamy consistency allows for easy application and blending, and it offers sheer coverage with oil control and a semimatte finish. Plus, there’s great color selection for a wide range of skin tones.” — Francesca Roman

 

 

 

 

 

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Hourglass Vanish Seamless Finish Foundation Stick

“The stick application makes this perfect for when you’re on the go. Not only is it mess-free, but the formula offers full coverage (essentially like a concealer), goes on silky, and buffs into the skin like butter! The line’s color range is also amazing — it has you covered on every end of the spectrum!” — Alison Christian

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MAC Face and Body Foundation

“This supersheer foundation, which has become a cult favorite, has a watery texture that can offer the lightest of coverage. It also dries down and can be built up if you’d like more. It mimics the skin’s texture, offering the perfect veil of pigment. It’s best applied with a flat nylon brush (like MAC’s #191) and is good for all skin types.” — Ashleigh Ciucci

Makeup News: The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color

 

 

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The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, esthetics and makeup school in San Jose, is a lover of Instagram makeup style. Who doesn’t love, those bold brows,  pouty lips and fleek eye shadow looks. We came across a new trend all over our favorite beauty instagramers, and it is all about The Barbie-Inspired Eye Color. Check out the article below by: 

 

 

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Scroll through your Instagram feed (if you follow a lot of beauty bloggers!), and one thing should be apparent: pink eye is rampant! The Barbie-inspired eye color may seem unexpected for Fall (when dark colors usually reign supreme), but it’s definitely a spreading movement. Think of it as a nod to October sunsets, Autumn leaves, and the flush you get from being in the cold air too long. We love it for holiday party makeup, a wedding look, or workwear.

“A playful and pretty pop of pink shadow can work to instantly brighten your look,” Kelli J. Bartlett, Director of Makeup Artistry at Glamsquad, told POPSUGAR. “This trend has a youthful and energetic quality that can look dreamy or dramatic, depending on the shade and application you choose.”

So let’s talk about how to find the right pink so you look sick not sickly. In general, Bartlett believes all skin tones can rock a pink shadow, and the best way to find yours is trial and error. “When finding the right type of pink (cool or warm), you should consider your overall coloring (hair color, complexion, and eye color) as this will inform the type of pink that complements you best,” she said. “Rich raspberries look amazing on deeper tones, while light blush can look gorgeous on fair skin.”

She also has a hack if you’re not ready to buy a pink palette, but still looking to experiment. “For those who aren’t ready for hot pinky pink, pop your favorite blush color on your eye,” she advised. “You can also test the trend by dabbing some of your favorite pink/peach lipstick (not the liquid matte kind though!) on your finger, and swiping it back and forth on your eyelid. Use your finger to buff the color into the brow bone. Try swatching on the back of your hand first to test its stain potential.”

Now that you’ve found the right hue, make sure to wear it in a modern way. “This trend looks best when paired with minimal makeup and a lush lash,” she said. “Complete your look by wearing a similar pink hue on your cheeks and lips. This is just the right amount of color-coordinating without appearing too matchy-matchy.” Also: She suggests using a fluffy brush to dust a little shadow on your brow bone to give warmth to the look.

There is one place pink shadow should not go. “To avoid possibly looking sickly, focus on the upper eyelid only and steer clear of the lower waterline,” she explained. “Applying on the lower lash line can make your eyelids look irritated.”

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CONTEMPORARY WATERCOLOR HAIR!

Here at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Academy in San Jose, we love us some watercolor tresses. You can find ladies of all ages rocking this trend! We came a across this fab article on Popsugar.com showcasing PRAVANA Artistic Color Director Vadre Grigsby, creating her version of the look. Check out the article below to learn more.

By now the image of a woman with rainbow, unicorn-like hair seems commonplace. The look has been trending on Instagram for a few years, but that doesn’t mean we are over it. And sometimes the classics — like watercolor-inspired locks — are still our favorites.

This video of Pravana Artistic Color Director Vader Grigsby creating the look on a blonde woman reminded us how pretty watercolor hair is. In the video, the technique was also explained in case you want to try it or tell your colorist how to do it.

Rainbow hues were applied horizontally to sections in random areas. Shades are layered in an artistic way. “This look is created visually and relies on subtle saturation of colors in varying shades,” the video caption states. The colorist continues to take sections and repeat this technique so the watercolors layer over each other.

Watch it to see this mesmerizing and gorgeous mermaid transformation!