TSPA Beauty School GIVES AWAY 50,000.00 IN SCHOLARSHIPS!

 

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The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose, a cosmetologist and skincare school understands the challenges students can face when it comes to financing your career investment. To assist with the cost of education, TSPA offers a variety of scholarship opportunities and grant(s) for those who qualify. Every year The Salon Professional Academy gives away $50,000 dollars in scholarships to our students! How awesome is that! As a cosmetology student you can receive up to $3,800 in scholarships, and a esthetician student can receive up to $2,000 dollars. The Salon Professional Academy has five different scholarships to apply to. The TSPA Referral Scholarship, TSPA Tuition Scholarship, Ulta Beauty Scholarship, TSPA Redken Scholarship and the most popular the TSPA Diamond Academy Scholarship.

We are hear to help, support and grow your dream career as a cosmetologist or skincare expert. If you would like to learn more about all the scholarships that TSPA offers please join us here, and when you are ready to take a tour of The Salon Professional Academy please give us a ring at 408-784-4463 or send us a message. We looking forward to seeing you at The Salon Professional Academy in San Jose!

Makeup: Pretty & Flirty Valentine’s Day Makeup Look!

Yes! The most romantic day of the year is here. The Salon Professional Academy loves to celebrate Valentine’s Day. The flowers, candies and romantic dinners. But before you head out on your date night. Check out this uber chic Valentines day inspired makeup look by BeautifulYouTV. We are loving the detail work she did on the heart eyeliner. Feel the love and get inspired! Happy Valentines day!

 

Is a career in makeup artistry for you!

The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology, skin care and makeup school in San Jose loves to find new career paths for our students. And we found the perfect one for our makeup artist students! With the rise of live steaming services like, Netflix, Hulu and many others. And the demand for niche shows on these platforms, this has created jobs for makeup artist to specialize in film and television.  You maybe asking yourself what exactly does a film and t.v makeup artist do? Well I can tell you there is a lot of work behind the scenes. Every single actor that is seen on t.v is wearing some amount of makeup. It maybe a more natural look that can be seen on a news anchor or, creating a zombie for the newest episode of the walking dead. In any film and t.v makeup application the makeup artist needs to understand, skin tone, shapes, textures and how to apply makeup for an HD camrea.

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If you are ready to start your career as a makeup artist be sure to set up your tour today. Please call us at (408) 579-9111 or email us. The Salon Professional Academy looks forward to helping you start a stylish career.

 

 

Top 3 Reasons To Be A Cosmetologist!

Are you thinking about starting your career as a cosmetologist at The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond Academy in San Jose? We asked our students to share some of their reasons why they decided to embark on The Salon professionals Academy’s 1600 hour cosmetology program.Check out what some of our student have to say below. When your ready to start your career, please give us a call at (408) 579-9111 or email us here. We look forward to seeing you at The Salon Professional Academy!

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  1. Create your own style: From classic city chic blowouts to the tossed waves of boho fab. You will learn all the current styles, and you will also be evolving to create you own style for your clients.
  2.  No glass ceiling: You can go from salon assistant, master colorist to global salon empire CEO. There is no glass ceiling in the beauty industry.
  3.  The love of Beauty: Seeing the creation and ideals of beauty constantly evolving.

The Makeup World Is About To Turn Upside Down!

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The world is about to turn upside down with this amazing new silicone blending makeup sponge!

Silicone blending sponges are having a moment right now thanks to the Silisponge, an applicator that looks similar to a breast push-up pad and is designed to flawlessly blend in makeup. However, for some, the flat tool can be a little unwieldy, while others long for a textured surface similar to that of a true sponge.

A Kickstarter campaign for Evie Blender has taken the original silicone tool concept and claims to have perfected it. Its creator, makeup artist Angie Johnson, came up with the concept when working behind the scenes on television shows like Documentary Now!. For these programs, she put her special effects skills to use, and her experimentation with different silicone materials while creating prosthetics inspired Evie’s creation.

Its squishy, teardrop shape makes it easy to grip, and it features both a large end for buffing and a pointed end to get into small areas like under the eye and around the nose. It has a textured surface just like a real sponge but doesn’t hold on to makeup, making it easy to wash off (it doesn’t stain either). The hypoallergenic tool can even be boiled or wiped with rubbing alcohol to sanitize it — a major selling point for professional artists. Bonus: it’s sparkly!

Though the tool isn’t available for purchase yet, you can donate $28 to the Kickstarter campaign, which will secure your very own Evie for March delivery (should the campaign make its goal). Read on to see more shots of the Evie Blender, then give to the Kickstarter if you’re interested in trying it out!

 

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10 Reason Why Working In The Beauty Industry Rocks!!!

Are you thinking about starting a career in the beauty industry with The Salon Professional Academy, a Redken Diamond Academy in San Jose.We have come up with 10 reason why becoming a beauty professional is right for you in 2017. After you have read all the amazing reasons, give us a call to set up you TSPA student tour A.S.A.P!

See you soon at TSPA!

 

  1. To have the ability to support yourself and your family.
  2. To have endless career opportunities.
  3. To have a beauty career that is recession proof.
  4. To have a skill that allows you to make money on the side.
  5. To be part of the Beauty Industry.
  6. To have a beauty career that can grow as much as your imagination.
  7. To have skills that others need and want.
  8. To enjoy pleasing people and giving them confidence through their look.
  9. To get products at “stylist cost!!”
  10. TO HAVE THE POWER TO TRANSFORM PEOPLE’S LIVES.

Hair News: Princess Leia The Hair Icon!

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“I’d like to wear my old hairstyle again—but with white hair; I think that would be funny,” Carrie Fisher told TV Guide in 2014. And who could doubt the object of her amusement, those storied side-slung Princess Leia buns? In her long career, Fisher knew how to write and deliver a punch line. She also knew how to wear one, with a sly feminist twist. That first Princess Leia hairstyle, two enormous buns plastered on either side of her head, is arguably the most recognizable movie hairdo of the past 50 years. The look has ricocheted through the decades in comedy skits, Halloween costumes, online hairstyle tutorials, and mountains of Star Wars merch. In one episode of 30 Rock, Tina Fey as Liz Lemon wore the style in an effort to seem “crazy” and get out of jury duty (it didn’t work).

 

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But humor wasn’t always the point. Female empowerment takes many forms, and for many who relished the inclusion of a confident, brave, happily-single woman in the action movie oeuvre, it took the form—partially at least—of bodacious side buns. And some no doubt simply welcomed another choice at the party store that wasn’t quite as objectifying as bunny ears or a Wilma Flintstone wig. Who would choose to playact as a pin-up or a stone age wife when you could be the leader of the Rebel Alliance?

There’s a wide chasm between contemporary fashion and sci-fi costume fantasy. It would be a little disappointing if a heroine from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away had a chic bob or a ladylike French twist. Certainly, there are other crazy hairstyles in the film universe, but those buns stand out because they are at once simple and over-the-top. They’re also memorable and nearly impossible to overlook—both qualities more than a few feminist women, then or now, might aspire to. That contradiction, combined with Fisher’s campy delivery of some deeply cheesy lines—”Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi; you’re my only hope!”— made an indelible imprint on film hair-story.

The Princess Leia buns appeared in the first Star Wars movie in 1977. Lucas told Time magazine that he was “working very hard to create something that wasn’t fashion” with the overall look—specifically with Leia’s hair. This was a departure from B-movie sci-fi practice, where you’d often see huge ’60s bouffants or ’50s flips in outer space. (Spaceships must have some seriously talented intergalactic hairdressers on board.) “I went with a kind of southwestern Pancho Villa-woman revolutionary look,” Lucas said. “The buns are basically from turn-of-the-century Mexico.” Only trouble is, you can spend hours searching online photo archives (alas, I did) and still have absolutely no idea what he’s talking about. Perhaps by Pancho Villa he meant Leia’s revolutionary élan. And though much of this tribe is centered in northeastern Arizona, perhaps by “southwestern” he meant the Hopi people. The Hopi maiden “squash blossom” hairstyle bears a very strong resemblance to Leia’s oversized whorls (or rather the other way around).

This is not the only theory, of course. The Japanese Shimada chignon can have protuberances on each side. Vintage comic book images of Batgirl and Flash Gordan’s Queen Fria are another possible source of inspiration. And more recently, eagle-eyed viewers will have noticed a version of the side bun on the ladies of The Hollow Crown, a PBS mini-series of Shakespeare’s history plays. My money is on the squash blossom.


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Today, we hear “princess” and think of the Disney coterie—Sleeping Beauty, Belle, Jasmine, Ariel—swirling about in yards of pastel taffeta toward an inevitable destiny of landing a prince. Leia, in unruffled virginal white and those glorious buns, was a different kind of princess, an exemplar of first-wave feminism: a rebel wielding a blaster and mowing down Imperial Stormtroopers. A woman who, in the first movie at least, seems impatient and unimpressed with posturing males and is single-minded in her mission.

Still, there were chinks in her armor. That famous hairdo absurdly never seemed to move during multiple narrow escapes and scrapes with death. And, as Fisher cheekily wrote in her memoir The Princess Diarist, “Who wears that much lip gloss into battle?” She made it clear that she hated, yet still wore, that metallic gold bikini when she was enslaved to Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. Some parents were miffed that gold-bikini sex slave merchandise was still being marketed to kids, a controversy she didn’t tolerate, telling the Wall Street Journal that concerned parents could tell their kids that “a giant slug captured me and forced me to wear that stupid outfit, and then I killed him because I didn’t like it. And then I took it off. Backstage.”

For the entirety of her life, Fisher had an eye for the absurdities of moviemaking and fame that didn’t always jibe with feminist orthodoxies, but often did. “Please stop debating about whether or not I aged well, unfortunately it hurts all three of my feelings,” she tweeted last year. “My BODY hasn’t aged as well as I have.”

In another memoir, Wishful Drinking, Fisher recounted why she wasn’t allowed to wear a bra under Leia’s white dress. “There’s no underwear in space,” she recalled Lucas telling her. Puzzled, she asked him why, and he explained that in a weightless environment, your body would expand but your bra would not, so it would end up strangling you. “I think this would make for a fantastic obituary,” Fisher wrote. “I tell my younger friends that no matter how I go I want it reported that I drowned in moonlight, strangled by my own bra.”

And wearing those fantastic buns, no doubt.

Article BY DAVID DENICOLO

Makeup News: Cheeto Bronzer

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When applying bronzer, people often fear they’ll look unnaturally orange. Emily Susanah, however, is all about that cheese-like glow—literally. Weirdly enough, Cheetos bronzer exists. It debuted last month as part of the popular chip company’s holiday collection, and the beauty blogger recently posted a video on social media of herself trying the usual (and totally unexpected) beauty product out. When we say her mini tutorial has gone viral, we aren’t exaggerating. About 8.3 million people have viewed the clip she put on Instagram in the past week. We’re used to seeing Huda Kattan’s videos getting around 2 million, but 8 million people stopping to watch this hilarious video is a bit more than we can fathom. The universal love of Cheetos is real, guys. This video is proof.

In her viral video, Emily Susanah brushed the Colour de Cheeto Bronzer, which looks like queso poured into a cosmetic jar, in the usual places one would want to glow, like the hollows of the cheeks, along the hairline, and down either side of the nose. The final result looked like she wiped powdery remnants from the bottom of a Cheetos bag on her face. In her Instagram caption, the beauty blogger suggested alternative uses for the cheese-colored bronzer. “Obviously this would work better for eyeshadow, special effects, lips,” she wrote. We couldn’t agree more.

You can watch Emily Susanah’s Cheetos bronzer below.

BY DEVON ABELMAN

Makeup News: Lite-Brite Henna

 

 

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OMG! Everyone at The Salon Professional Academy, a cosmetology and skincare school in San Jose are freaking out of the newest trend for 2017, UV henna. The colors are amazing under a black light. This is great to add a pop of fun to any New Years Eve Event!

 

If you know who to follow, social media is a beauty inspo treasure trove: Contouring and mermaid hair) were both born on Instagram and YouTube. Now UV henna tattoos will likely pop up on your feed, stat. And they’re not as sun-damagey as they sound. They’re actually glow-in-the-dark temporary henna tattoos, perfect for music festivals, nightclubs, or just your own after-dark amusement.

According to Popsugar, unlike traditional henna, these lite-brite inspired tats aren’t made with dye from the henna plant. Instead, UV henna tattoos are painted on with a special type of temporary body paint that glows under black light. (Which is to say the “UV henna tattoo” is a bit of a misnomer…) Although the colorful paint isn’t waterproof—and therefore, won’t last nearly as long as a real henna tattoo—the glow-in-the-dark effect makes a major statement. You can go the traditional route, and use the paint to draw on an intricate, henna-inspired pattern—we’ve got some major inspiration for you right here—or go a different route, and paint on just about anything you like. Maybe your initials? Your sign? Your address? (Kidding on that last one.) Either way, this fun, easy, and low-commitment beauty trend should definitely be on your list of trends to try in 2017—it’s certainly on ours. They’re kind of like a flash tattoo, if flash tattoos were glow-in-the-dark and DIY.

Article BY GILLIAN FULLER